Miller

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Descendants of John Miller

Generation No. 1

1. JOHN1 MILLER was born (Source: Cynthia Forde.). He married ?.

Child of JOHN MILLER and ? is:

2. i. JAMES2 MILLER, b. Abt 1770, South Carolina.

 

Generation No. 2

2. JAMES2 MILLER (JOHN1) was born Abt 1770 in South Carolina (Source: Cynthia Forde.). He married RUTHY ? (Source: Cynthia Forde.).

From Cynthia Forde information:

Subject: Re: [SC] James Miller ca. 1775 - ?

Date: Sunday, February 13, 2000 12:31 PM

Cynthia,

Enjoyed your message!

Something here sounds so very interesting and familiar to me. FIRST Anderson is not so strange as a middle name when you consider that Scotch-Irish folks oftentimes put the name of the Mother's father as the name of the first or second son so look for James Anderson to be the father of the mother of James Anderson MILLER. Not that this was one of your names below but I used it as an example. Next door to our MILLERs in Spartanburg was a family of ANDERSONS the earliest of which was Wm. Anderson. He also had a grandson named Wm. Anderson who bought back the dower land of James Miller's wife Adenia Mayson who was raised by Major David Anderson. So Anderson connections are common in Spartanburg and upper SC. So I will tell you this story: James Miller died 1795 Spartanburg was by birth likely an Irishman i.e, his brother Nathaniel said he was b. Ireland 1738. This James who died in 1795 and left a will naming his children but no wife had a son John and a son Nathaniel, I have records of Nathaniel going first to TN then to AL and living in Al til death in Marion Co AL. John has disappeared from the face of the earth about the same time. John would have been born between 1777 and 1795 don't know when exactly but there are no records of him in Spartanburg that I can find so maybe, just maybe this is your John. I DON"T KNOW!

There were not that many Wilsons in Spartanburg that I know of, but some. All of James' children left the Spartanburg area either by death or by relocation in about 1816 or thereabouts. Still no word on where John went. I will have to finish this after church see you in couple of hours.

 _____________________________________ 

back now and also possible from sounds of names etc to be yours comes from the Andrea files as: John Miller m. Sarah Anderson Laurens Co SC....will of her father proves it. their children: George, Joshua, Anderson, James residing in TN, John Miller jr., Wm. living out of SC, Jane Mathis living out of SC, Elizabeth wife of Wm. Teague, Sallie wife of John Cason,

 _____________________________________ 

Now back to the original possibility that your John is the missing John of my James MILLER family; all I can say is that the dates of their being in that 1830 census would be close to right for our John. Doubt that I have helped but at least I gave you something to think about for awhile.  Charles. Later this same family excerpt mentions James as living in Wilson Co TN.

More About JAMES MILLER:  A Scotsman and a Presbyterian (Source: Cynthia Forde.)

Notes for RUTHY ?:

From Cynthia Forde information:

Elizabeth is one choice for James Miller's wife; Ruthie Anderson is another possibility for James Miller's wife's name because there was a Ruthie living next to John and Nancy Mary on the 1830 Census in TN. Anderson as a maiden name is a possibility because of Wm A. Miller.

Another possibility is Mary Jane because of the traditional naming patterns that follow the second daughter's name after the father's mother. Wild cards all of these.

Child of JAMES MILLER and RUTHY ? is:

3. i. JOHN3 MILLER, b. December 25, 1803, South Carolina; d. August 6, 1878, Board Camp, Arkansas.

 

Generation No. 3

3. JOHN3 MILLER (JAMES2, JOHN1) was born December 25, 1803 in South Carolina (Source: Cynthia Forde.), and died August 6, 1878 in Board Camp, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.). He married (1) NANCY MARY WILSON 1826 in Monroe Co, Tennessee (Source: Cynthia Forde.). She was born July 6, 1806 in Tennessee (Source: Cynthia Forde.), and died August 31, 1866 in Board Camp, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.). He married (2) SARA JOHNSON 1875 in Polk Co, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde; Gladys Tillotson.). She was born September 12, 1820 in Georgia (Source: Gladys Tillotson.).

  • Notes for JOHN MILLER:  Burial: Unknown, Cherry Hill, Mena, Arkansas
  • Notes for NANCY MARY WILSON:  Burial: Unknown, Cherry Hill, AR

Census Info:

1850 Georgia, Dade Co. District 21, household 169 line 8

  • Look for 1840 Dade Co, Georgia about half way down line 16 (marks how many kids - not names)
  • Look for 1860 Polk Co Arkansas Dallas PO pg 6, house 39 family 34
  • Look for 1870 Polk Co Arkansas Fulton Twp house 449
  • Look in Tennessee, Georgia, and Arkansas for more census information about John's family

From Robert E Miller information:

John Miller came to Trenton, Georgia (Dade Co) from Tennessee after 1830 according to Ibby Rebecca Killian Skankee (daughter of Noah).

John Miller came to Arkansas (en route to Texas) about 1860 with his whole family. No record at any time of a wife or who she was or where she died. There were six sons and 1 daughter. The 1860 Arkansas (Polk Co) census states his age as 57 and birthplace as Kent. (P7 #601 on Microfilm June 1860). His mailing address in 1860 was Dallas, Arkansas (near Mena) and the township was center. Living with him at that time was a Nancy Miller age 34 born in Tenn. Also listed on that census were Mary J age 22, William A age 18, Christopher Columbus age 15, Hiram A age 13, Mary J age 6, Nancy age 4, William age 2. We don't know who Nancy was or who her husband was. Were the three young children hers?

In the 1870 census (Polk Co Arkansas), John Miller is listed as a farmer with real estate value at $700 and personal property at $200. Living with John Miller in this census is youngest son Hiram, born in Georgia and his older son James' 4 children. James and his wife Elizabeth are both dead (64 & 65) and John's daughter Mary is raising her brother's 4 children. This we know from "word of mouth handed down" as well as this 1870 census. They listed as Quillian 18, Nancy E 14, Nelson 10, and Robert 6.

1880 Census in Polk Co Arkansas shows no Millers.

1890 census was burned.

Quillian came back to Arkansas to die. His grave is in old Dallas Cemetery. 1899 - he was 47 years old. It is known that he came home to Aunt Mary crippled with arthritis and very ill with something else - he died a few days later.

From Cynthia Forde information:

JOHN AND NANCY MARY MILLER'S STORY

The story of the Millers really begins elsewhere with information that is yet to be discovered. Most of our Miller information comes to us from family historian, Dorothy Ellison Miller, and her late husband Aaron Miller, a grandson of William Anderson Miller, John Miller's son. Dorothy lives in Mena, Arkansas. Other sources researched are the Historical Society of Dade Co, the Federal Census Records, obituaries, newspaper articles, land and deed records, wills, and some autobiographies of the sons of John Miller.

John Miller was born to James Miller in Tennessee in the year of our Lord, 1803. His father, James was Scotch Irish and a Staunch Presbyterian whose immigrant father settled near Charleston, SC in 1758 .

We know from family history and census records that John was born either in Tennessee as one census indicates or in South Carolina according to the biography of George Miller. John's father was James Miller, described as "an Irishman by descent" in George's biography, Western Arkansas Biographies. The article states that James Miller was born and died in South Carolina. We do not know of any siblings of John Miller. Another son, Joseph Miller's descendant, Joseph Jr. understood that James Miller emigrated from Co Antrim, Ireland at the age of 16 with his father, James Miller, Sr. We do not know the name of John's mother. It is suspected that her name was 'Ruthie' from the 1830 Federal Census Records in Monroe Co, Tennessee where "Ruthie Miller" lives next door to John Miller and his bride of four years. Ruthie was about the right age to be John's mother and to be 'neighbors' usually signifies some relationship.

In 1826, John married Nancy Mary Wilson. Until very recently, the name attached to Nancy Mary's father was Joseph Wilson, a farmer and a trader, who is buried in Macon, GA. This information also comes to us from the biography of George R. Miller, a son of John and Nancy Mary's. In 1830, we find a Joseph Wilson listed in Monroe Co, Tennessee as well. The census shows his age to be about right for Nancy's father. He is listed with a much younger woman and several young children. This could be a second marriage... or it could be Joseph living with a widowed daughter. It is believed that Joseph Wilson died in Bibb Co, GA. An obituary for a neighboring Co shows a Joseph Wilson, Jr. and his mother, Sarah, who died within a few years of each other. This is a possible wife's name for Joseph.

In the year 1835, John Miller (GA Abstract Records Office) purchased 420 Acres of land in District # 21 near Rising Fawn, Georgia for $3000.00. That was a large sum of money in those days. A moving autobiography written by his son, John Thornton Miller, describes life on this plantation as well as the philosophies, hopes, and dreams of a pioneer family in rural Georgia.

Life was difficult in Dade Co. The time was not so far past the exodus of the American Indian from Dade Co in 1838. John Miller and his wife, Nancy Mary, were amongst the first white settlers in Dade Co to struggle with the wilderness of northwest Georgia. To compound the trouble of life in Dade, the Co was also cut-off from the rest of the state of GA by Lookout Mountain. Appalachia was just a few miles north into Tennessee.

Some traces of the history of the Millers are found in three places: John Thornton Miller's Diary gives us an excellent portrait of life for those who lived amidst the struggles of pioneering, and slavery; pieces of information are found in the Dade Co Historical Book; in the history of the Methodist-Episcopal Church in Trenton, the name Miller is listed as one of the first settlers. One of the early school teachers was named, 'Miller'... but no other information is given. The information found in the Land Records Office was most revealing.

Two sons, George and James began making land acquisitions in 1850. John Miller purchased more land as well. They continued to make purchases on a regular basis until 1859. In 1859, they started selling all of the land they owned and with several other families began an exodus from Dade Co towards Texas but put down roots in Arkansas.

Several issues had been converging. One of the most important issues was the threat of war. Dade Co was the first Co to secede in the South. It must have been a political hotbed. Dade Co seceded from Georgia before Georgia seceded from the United States. Elizabeth Miller's father-in-law, Col. Tatum, was the senator that determined to secede... and drove his horse night and day back to Dade Co to bring about the crucial vote to begin the process of separation from the state of GA. (Dade Co, GA did not become a part of the State of GA or the US until 1948... because their separation had been forgotten.)

Economics were also key to 'selling out' and moving West. Dade Co was a challenge agriculturally. The fertile valley was just a mile wide at points. Fortunately, the Millers had the vision to sell before they were burned out of GA. The Miller Plantation was the site of the Battle of Chickamauga some three years later.

"Where the Lookout Mountain Scenic Highway crosses the road which leads down through Johnson's Crook, the cross is marked by a large, flat stone with two or three other stones piled on top of it. (A deep well, forty feet deep). As you take the road to the right, it will lead you gently into Johnson's Crook, that won fame during the Civil War Days. You will travel over stones that were tramped on by more than 40,000 men a few days preceding the Battle of Chickamauga. Johnson's Crook on the west conspires with Steven's Gap on the Eastside to cut Lookout Mountain almost in two. This was an attractive shortcut to the Federal officers in choosing a route to get into McLemore Cove on the Eastside of the mountain. Major General George H. Thomas started his army through this crook on September 5, 1863. Hurricane Creek in Johnson's Crook joins Lookout Creek. It is here where General Thomas encamped on the night of September 6, and the following day, Negley reached the top of the mountain. According to General Thomas' report his immediate troops left the foot of the mountain at 10:00 A. M. and at noon they were atop the mountain, save the wagon train which leads across Lookout's narrowest breath" (See Rising Fawn: Johnson's Creek, History of Dade Co, GA.)

During the time John Miller lived in Monroe Co, TN and Dade Co,GA, he served as a Co and probate judge as well as a substantial farmer according to the biography by his son, George R. Miller, of Polk Co, AR. Early records show they were of the Presbyterian Denomination who later embraced the Methodist Episcopal church. Five of the sons served the Confederacy; James died in a prison camp. A daughter, Elizabeth, died giving birth to her first daughter. She is the only Miller buried in the beautiful Miller Cemetery located on the plantation. Elizabeth was married to Casper Tatum. The daughter of Elizabeth and Casper, Nancy Tatum, was raised by the Tatums initially, but is buried in Arkansas near her Miller grandparents. Four of the sons married women from Dade Co: George R. Miller married Martha Davis, Joseph married her sister, Sarah Davis. James married Elizabeth Killian; John Thornton Miller married Sara L Russell.

Five of the Miller sons served the Confederacy. Joseph enlisted in Dade Co. William, James, Columbus, enlisted in Arkansas. James died in Johnson Island, a Prison Camp in Ohio. All were ranking officers at the time they were mustered out of service.

James' wife, Elizabeth Killian, from Dade Co, had just delivered their fourth child, Robert Morgan Miller, when word reached them the war was ending. Elizabeth set out on horseback with her sister-in-law, Mary Jane, James' sister, to find James. She left the children with her in-laws, the Millers in Arkansas. They spent the harsh winter searching for him, only to return home terribly ill. Elizabeth died not having learned that James died at the prison camp on Johnson's Island, Ohio the previous October.

John and Nancy Mary Wilson Miller's sons went on to lead lives of service to God, family, and country through their many contributions to the Church as ministers, ordained deacons, holders of state and local political offices in the state of Arkansas. One of the sons was a gubernatorial candidate; most of them retained a high interest in farming and stewardship of the land. All of them remained staunch Democrats in their views, members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and died in the faith.

In 1987, one hundred and thirty two years later, my husband, Stan, our son, Paul and I took a trip to see this plantation, to visit Dade Co, and explore the historicity of the Miller family in Georgia. We found the plantation still intact, the slave quarters still standing; the foundation of a house is present but it is not known if this is the original house or not. The house had been burned to the ground. There were no crops planted... one could imagine the land as it must have looked in 1835 when John and Nancy Mary moved on to the property.

Nearby, the Miller Cemetery stands, resplendent... beautifully landscaped in contrast to the ruins of the plantation. Tall steps lead up under a large arched entryway with the name of Miller in the ornate wrought iron. We stepped carefully walking in light rain... looking for headstones... looking for one headstone in particular: Elizabeth Miller Tatum who died giving birth to Nancy Tatum the first born of Casper and Elizabeth. But, it was not to be found. Engraved markers were not the common means of marking graves at that time and place. Simple boulders marked the graves. There were many of those.

We had been told by the Historical Society that they were puzzled about the Miller Cemetery... because no one knew about the Millers... and there were no Millers buried there. We were able to tell them about the Millers and the fact that Elizabeth Miller is the only Miller buried in the cemetery. We were also able to provide them with the Miller History and the autobiography of John Thornton Miller's. This information will be published in the 2000 History Book of Dade Co.

DOCUMENTATION

Monroe Co, TN Records 1820-1870 Vol. I  Researched by Reba Boyer - 1969  Page 114   # 981 - 26 September 1837 John Miller of Ga to William C. Lea of Monroe Co - Transfer of Land  Monroe Co, TN Records 1820-1870 - Vol II - 976.888 V2b  Researched by Reba Bayless Boyer, 1970  #316 - April 1826; 

John Miller a citizen of Cherokee Nation is Atty. in fact for Telaskaki, who took reservation in Monroe Co and was run off through fear of white me, but left a white man as Lessee; John Isbell was granted same land.

Nancy Mary and John are listed in the 1830 Federal Census of Monroe Co, Tennessee.

In 1835, the Millers and their children purchased $3000.00 worth of land in Dade Co, GA., Dist. No. 21, near Rising Fawn. Research of the GA Land Lottery and Indian Land Lottery did not reveal a John Miller receiving land through the lottery.

RE: Land Deeds in Dade Co, Sue Forrester writes:

First -- the General Index book is 0 (zero) not O (the letter)... this is often confused. This is the oldest general index book we have and the next is 1.

Second -- the first date you see is the date of transaction and the second date is the date the instrument was recorded.

Third -- Sometimes (not always) if the instrument was a deed, the clerk would write in small numbers the land lot and district numbers next to the word "deed". For instance, on the first John H. Miller it had 225-10/deed. This is lot 225 in the 10th district. This land lot 225 in the 10th district fits the area where that JOHN H. MILLER would have been located. So does land lot 246.

Your MILLERs were in the southern part of the Co closer to the Alabama line. However, this doesn't mean that they would not have purchased land in another part of the Co. The names of sellers/buyers such as the Hazelhurst, Hanna, Forester, and Chadwick all fit names associated with the area where your ancestors were located. The land district numbers primarily in that area are 18 and 11 and sometimes 12 might stretch into the valley. The Miller place that you refer to is known as the Lambert place today. It was owned for years by Pyron Lambert. It is now owned by Kenneth Millican.

Federal Census page 125, TN

1850 US Census, Dade Co, GA; page 13 A- District No. 21, August 25, 1850 by Stephen L. Pace

169-169 John MILLER, 46, m. farmer, value of real estate owned: $3000.00 born: TN

Married within the year (this must be an error... or it refers to one of the children)

Mary, 44, f, b. TN - cannot read or write

Mary, 13, f, b. GA

John, 10, m. b: GA

William, 8, m, b: GA

Columbus, 5, m b: GA

Hiram, 3, m. b: GA

James, 22, m. Farmer, b: TN

Joseph 20, m. Farmer, b. TN

George, 16, m, Farmer, b: TN

page 22 A Dist. No. 21 , September 21, 1850

Census of 1870 - Polk Co, AR - Fulton Township

Miller, John 64 bn. TN

Hiram Douglas, 22, GA

James' children:

Quillan, 18 - GA

Nancy E. 14 - GA

Nelson, 10, GA

Robert M., 6, AR

Stafford, Nathan 64 TN

Mary Jane, 33, GA

Census of 1880 - Polk Co, AR, Fulton Township (Board Camp)

Stafford, Mary 43 GA. TN TN

Stafford, Georgiann 8 AR, TN GA

Miller, Hiram Douglas, 32 GA. TN TN

Elected: 1850, Co and probate judge

Occupation: Farmer/TN and Rising Fawn, GA (Source: (1) Dave Rambo, The Descendants of Peter Gunnarson Rambo, GEDCOM download., (2) MillerWorksSept.FTW.)

Notes for NANCY MARY WILSON:

Census Info:

1850 Georgia, Dade Co. District 21, household 169 line 8

From Cynthia Forde information:

Nancy Mary Wilson was born in Indian Territory, Tennessee. We first learn of her presence in the Monroe Co, TN marriage records to John Miller in 1826. Sometimes she was called, Mary. At other times, Nancy. The memoirs of John Thornton Miller reveal a woman of prayer, soft and gentle.

Notes for SARA JOHNSON:

Census Info:

1880 Arkansas, Polk Co. Fulton Twp, page 549B

Children of JOHN MILLER and NANCY WILSON are:

4. i. JAMES MONROE4 MILLER, b. January 26, 1827, Monroe Co, Tennesee; d. October 1, 1864, Johnson's Island, Illinois on the Ohio River as a prisoner of war.

5. ii. JOSEPH WILSON MILLER, b. May 11, 1829, Tennessee; d. January 30, 1903, Arkadelphia, Clark Co, Arkansas.

iii. DOUG MILLER, b. Bef. 1830 (Source: Robert E Miller.).

6. iv. "BETTY" ELIZABETH ANN MILLER, b. June 7, 1832, Monroe Co, Tennesee; d. April 24, 1850, Dade Co, Georgia.

7. v. GEORGE RUSSELL MILLER, b. August 7, 1834, Monroe Co, Tennesee; d. December 4, 1903, Polk Co, Arkansas.

8. vi. MARY JANE MILLER, b. March 22, 1837, Rising Fawn, Georgia; d. November 10, 1899, Board Camp, Polk Co, Arkansas.

9. vii. JOHN THORNTON MILLER, b. October 14, 1839, Rising Fawn, Georgia; d. 1921, Polk Co, Arkansas.

10. viii. WILLIAM ANDERSON MILLER, b. February 25, 1842, Rising Fawn, Georgia; d. June 18, 1915, Board Camp, Arkansas.

11. ix. "LUM" CHRISTOPHER COLUMBUS MILLER, b. January 3, 1845, Rising Fawn, Georgia; d. April 12, 1891, Board Camp, Montgomery Co, Arkansas.

12. x. HIRAM DOUGLAS MILLER, b. July 5, 1847, Rising Fawn, Dade Co., Georgia; d. 1901, Board Camp, Arkansas.

xi. THOMAS MILLER, b. Abt 1855, Georgia.

Census Info:

1880 Arkansas, Polk Co. Fulton Twp, page 549B

1880 census living with step mother Sarah Miller

 

Generation No. 4

4. JAMES MONROE4 MILLER (JOHN3, JAMES2, JOHN1) was born January 26, 1827 in Monroe Co, Tennesee (Source: Cynthia Forde; Robert E Miller.), and died October 1, 1864 in Johnson's Island, Illinois on the Ohio River as a prisoner of war (Source: Robert E Miller.). He married ELIZABETH CATHERINE KILLIAN July 24, 1851 in Trenton, Dade Co, Georgia (Source: Cynthia Forde; Robert E Miller.), daughter of WILLIAM KILLIAN and ELIZABETH BOST. She was born April 11, 1834 in Trenton or Rising Fawn, Georgia (Source: Cynthia Forde; Robert E Miller.), and died February 24, 1865 in Mena, Polk Co, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde; Robert E Miller.).

  • More About JAMES MONROE MILLER:  Burial: Unknown, Johnson Island Prison Camp, Ohio
  • More About ELIZABETH CATHERINE KILLIAN:  Burial: Old Dallas Cemetery, Polk Co, Arkansas (Source: Robert E Miller.)

Census Info:

1850 Georgia, Dade Co. District 21, household 169 line 8

  • Look for 1860 Polk Co Arkansas Dallas PO pg 6, house 39 family 34

James Monroe Miller was a captain in the Civil War in the Confederate Army.

Johnson's Island Civil War Prison information:

Danbury, Ohio - Co of Ottawa. - Sandusky Bay

National Register Number: 75001514

Resource type: Site.

Property type: Defense - military facility.

Congressional District: OH-9 Certified Local Government: NO

Current use/information: Cemetery.

Statement of Significance (as of designation - June 21, 1990):

Johnson's Island, the site of an important Confederate prisoners-of-war camp during much of the Civil War, is located 2.5 miles northwest of Sandusky, Ohio, in Sandusky Bay. Johnson's Island was chosen because of its size (large enough to house the facility and yet small enough to be easily manageable), wood resources (mostly for fuel), and its proximity to Sandusky which would make provisioning possible. Because of its mission as the major depot for the confinement of Confederate general, field, and company grade officers, Johnson's Island assumes particular significance as a critical element in the war of attrition that brought victory to the Union. Although plots and conspiracies by Confederate agents operating from Canadian sanctuaries and Northern Copperheads to foment mass escapes came to naught, they compelled the Lincoln Administration to divert needed resources of men and materiel from more important theaters of the war.

Cynthia Forde information:  Died in Civil War on Johnson Island as a prisoner of war. 

From: "David Bush" <dbush@heidelberg.edu>

To: "Cynthia Forde" <cynthia.forde@worldnet.att.net>

Subject: Johnson's Island POW-James Monroe Miller

Date: Monday, February 05, 2001 11:29 AM

Dear Cynthia Forde,

I want to thank you for writing to me about James Monroe Miller, who died at Johnson's Island. We do have a record of his death at the island, but unfortunately there is no marker to his grave. we did not have much information about him, and am glad that you can provide us with more. I suspect that one day we will be able to provide you with additional information as well. He did die on October 1, 1864, as you noted. We had him listed as being a 3rd Lieut. with an Arkansas cavalry unit. At the time of death, it was noted that he was buried on the island.

My students will be conducting additional research for James Monroe and will formulate part of the response, which will be by snail mail.

I am always interested to obtain copies of any records, letters, diaries, maps, etc. that related specifically to the experience your relative had at Johnson's Island. If you have any records like these, I would certainly appreciate receiving copies of them, and of course would be glad to reimburse you for the expense. Also, if you have a photograph of him, I would certainly like a copy of that as well. It is always great to have a face with the name of the prisoner.

I will do what I can to find out what more we can find out about James Miller. Many times the records that others provide also have references to other prisoners, which then I can pass along to those relatives as well. There is no charge for this service. In the near future, we will be fundraising for the preservation of a portion of Johnson's Island. We will certainly ask for your support at that time.

You might be interested in the fact that we have been researching the cemetery for about 3 years now, and have a fairly complete map of the grave sites and at least the names of those that died here. We are intending to place another marker at the site with all the POW names on it that died at Johnson's Island. We have about 300 names of prisoners that died, much more than the 152 that are currently marked in the cemetery. certainly one of the Unknown markers is placed at Miller's grave site.

Thank you for your interest in Johnson's Island, and I look forward to hearing from you again soon.

sincerely,

Dave Bush

***********************************************

David R. Bush, Ph.D

Center for Historic and Military Archaeology

Heidelberg College

310 E. Market Street

Tiffin, Ohio 44883

(419) 448-2327

FAX (419) 448-2236

mailto:dbush@mail.heidelberg.edu

http://www.johnsonsisland.com (Johnson's Island WEBpage)

http://www.heidelberg.edu/offices/chma (Center's WEBpage)

http://www.archaeology.org (Archaeology Magazine's Webpage-follow the link  to Online and then hit Features to see what they have that is new from  Johnson's Island)

************************************************

Notes for ELIZABETH CATHERINE KILLIAN:

Excerpt from THE DESCENDANTS OF WILLIAM THOMAS KILLIAN 8/14/1996

M. LUTHER KILLIAN

1155 SIMMS HTS. RD.

KINGSTON SP. TENNESSEE 37082

More About JAMES MONROE MILLER:  Captain in the Civil War, Confederate army (Source: Robert E Miller.)

Notes for ELIZABETH CATHERINE KILLIAN:

Census Info:

1850 Georgia, Dade Co. District 21, household 50 line 17

Elizabeth is buried in the Old Dallas cemetery in Arkansas

Cynthia Forde information:

Elizabeth Catherine, the youngest child of William and Elizabeth Killian, married James Monroe Miller. They left Dade Co about 1860, with their children, William Samuel, Nancy Elizabeth, and their newborn baby, John 'Nelson" and James' parents and other relatives The Miller families were heading to Texas but settled in Polk Co, Arkansas in the town of Mena. James was fighting in the Civil War when Eizabeth gave birth to their fourth child, Robert Morgan. In the winter of 1864-65, Elizabeth left her children with her father-in-law, John Miller, and went to look for James. Accompanying her was Mary Jane, James' sister. After traveling by horseback during the harsh winter, Elizabeth returned to Mena where she soon died of pneumonia apparently never knowing that James had died the previous October in a prisoner-of-war camp at Johnson Island, Ohio. Excerpt from THE DESCENDANTS OF WILLIAM THOMAS KILLIAN 8/14/1996

M. LUTHER KILLIAN

1155 SIMMS HTS. RD.

KINGSTON SP. TENNESSEE 37082

Medical Information: Elizabeth died as a result of pheumonia contracted by exposure while hunting for her husband during the Civil War, crossing rivers, etc.

Marriage Notes for JAMES MILLER and ELIZABETH KILLIAN:  Elizabeth and James came from Trenton, Georgia, en route to Texas but settled at Mena, Arkansas

James M Miller died in Federal Prison Camp at Johnson's Island, Illinois on the Ohio River. He was a prisoner of war. Elizabeth died of pneumonia as the result of exposure while hunting for her husband during the Civil War.

Children of JAMES MILLER and ELIZABETH KILLIAN are:

i. "QUILLIAN" WILLIAM SAMUEL QUILLIAN5 MILLER, b. September 12, 1852 (Source: Cynthia Forde; Robert E Miller.); d. 1899.

  • More About "QUILLIAN" WILLIAM SAMUEL QUILLIAN MILLER:  Burial: Old Dallas Cemetery, Polk Co, Arkansas (Source: Robert E Miller.)

From the records of Robert Earl Miller:

William Samual Quillian Miller was baptized Dec 2 1852 by S Boise.

Quillian never married. He had arthritis and had to use crutches and a cane. Came west for his health. He spent some time in Nebraska, according to an old letter, and came to Montana to Sand Coulee where brother, Robert Morgan Miller had his homestead. When his health got so bad he had to leave, he returned to Arkansas to Aunt Mary's and said he had come home to die (Mena Arkansas). And a few days later he did die in 1899. He is buried there. He was called "Uncle Bud".

From Cynthia Forde information:

News Article: Dallas, Arkansas, Polk Co, AR.    POSTMASTER MILLER DEAD

This morning at about 4 0'clock, Mr. Quillin Miller, postmaster at Dallas, died of rheumatism of the heart. He has been a resident of Polk Co for a good many years and was a well respected man. The funeral will be held at 10:00 tomorrow and the remains interred in the Dallas cemetery.

13. ii. "NANNIE" NANCY ELIZABETH MILLER, b. November 7, 1855, Social Hill, Hot Spring, Arkansas; d. March 12, 1913, Eldorado, Union Co, Arkansas.

iii. "NELSON" JOHN NELSON MILLER, b. December 21, 1859, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde; Robert E Miller.); d. July 3, 1884, Dade Co, Georgia (Source: Cynthia Forde.).

More About "NELSON" JOHN NELSON MILLER:  Burial: Baptist Cemetery, Trenton, Georgia (Source: Cynthia Forde.)

Census Info:

1880 Georgia, Dade Co. Trenton Twp, Page 46D

From the records of Robert Earl Miller:

John Nelson Miller got diarrhea in Florida and returned to Dade Co. Georgia (Trenton). Died there of bloody flux as they called it. He was about 25 years old at the time of his death. He was living with his uncle Noah Killian. There was also an Aunt Nannie, Noah's sister, and another Aunt, Ibby Killian Morgan.

Information from Cynthia Forde:

'Nelson' was the only one who went back to Dade Co and died there in 1884 of 'bloody flux." He is buried in Dade Co... at Baptist Cemetery, Trenton, Ga. 1 mile north of the Courthouse in Trenton. (from Sue Forrester, Dade Co)

Obituaries: Clark Co Library, Arkansas: 7/14/83

"It is with sorrow that we learn of the sad death of Nelson Miller, well known here, which occurred (sic) in GA. on Tuesday night of last week. Miss Nannie Miller left here to go to him only to find him a shrouded corpse. A boy of many noble parts, some weaknesses as we all have, but extremely unfortunate. Requiescat in Pace!"

'Nelson' was the only one who went back to Dade Co and died there in 1884 of 'bloody flux." He is buried in Dade Co... at Baptist Cemetery, Trenton, Ga. 1 mile north of the Courthouse in Trenton. (from Sue Forrester, Dade Co)

Obituaries: Clark Co Library, Arkansas: 7/14/83

"It is with sorrow that we learn of the sad death of Nelson Miller, well known here, which occurred (sic) in GA. on Tuesday night of last week. Miss Nannie Miller left here to go to him only to find him a shrouded corpse. A boy of many noble parts, some weaknesses as we all have, but extremely unfortunate. Requiescat in Pace!"

14. iv. ROBERT MORGAN MILLER, b. March 14, 1863, Dallas, Arkansas; d. June 30, 1937, Helena, Montana.

 

5. JOSEPH WILSON4 MILLER (JOHN3, JAMES2, JOHN1) was born May 11, 1829 in Tennessee (Source: Cynthia Forde; Robert E Miller.), and died January 30, 1903 in Arkadelphia, Clark Co, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.). He married (1) "SALLIE" SARAH DAVIS Abt 1852 in Cherokee Co, Georgia (Source: Cynthia Forde; Robert E Miller.), daughter of WILLIAM DAVIS and MARGARET ?. She was born March 31, 1836 in Alabama (Source: Cynthia Forde.), and died September 1859 in Dallas, Polk Co, Arkansas. He married (2) MARY E WARD May 1, 1860 in Hot Springs Co, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.). She was born August 25, 1825 in North Carolina (Source: Cynthia Forde.), and died October 25, 1870 in Arkadelphia, Clark Co, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.). He married (3) ANNIE E MCCULHUM April 23, 1872 in Clark Co, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.). She was born Abt 1845 in North Carolina, and died October 27, 1883 (Source: Cynthia Forde.).

  • More About THE REV. JOSEPH WILSON MILLER:  Burial: Unknown, Rock Park Cemetery, Malvern, Arkansas
  • More About MARY E WARD:  Burial: Rock Park Cemetery, Malvern, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.)

Census Info:

1850 Georgia, Dade Co. District 21, household 169 line 8

1880 Arkansas, Clark Co. Arkadelphia Twp, page 466B

  • Look in the Ark 1870 census, Hot Springs Co, Teuate twp, Rock Point post office, pg 4 line 35 (Source: Robert E Miller.)

Joseph W Miller was a lawyer.

Information from Cynthia Forde:

JOSEPH WILSON MILLER -  Page 20, Clark Co, AR. News Articles # 94:

THE ARKADELPHIA SIGNAL was started in 1881 by Joseph Wilson Miller, John Nelson Miller and Isom P. Langley. "We learn from Messrs Miller and Langley that their new paper will be called the Arkadelphia Signal, and they intend to issue the first edition next Wednesday, which will be their regular publication day. It will be an eight column folic, and will have both sides printed at home." In 1882, it became the Arkansas Clipper and in 1883 sold to George M. Beck, who changed the name to the Herald.

Obituary of Joseph Miller: DEATH IF CAPT. J.W. MILLER 1-29-1903

Captain J. W. Miller, after a long illness, died on Monday night, at 11:00, at the residence of his son-in-law, S.R. Mc Nutt, aged 75 years.

Capt. Miller was a consistent member of the M.E. Church, South, and was a licensed local preacher of that denomination. For many years he was a prominent member of the Arkansas Bar. He represented Clark Co in the legislature, and he was a fearless champion of temperance and in 1894, was the prohibition candidate for governor, receiving 1,551 votes in the state. He had been married three times, his last wife having died twenty years ago. Three children survive him: Mrs. S.T. Mc Nutt and Miss Ella Miller, this city; Miss Nannie Miller, of Malvern, and a son, deputy State Superintendent, Ward Miller, of Little Rock.

His death was not unexpected, as he had been feel health for several years. All of his children were present at his bedside when he died. In the death of Capt. Joe Miller, this community has lost one of her truest and best citizens. His remains were carried to Malvern for internment.

MILLER -- Died, at the home of S.R. Mc Nutt, in Arkadelphia, AR., on January 26, 1903, Reverend Joseph W. Miller. Born in Tennessee May 11, 1830; joined the church in childhood; licensed to preach and ordained local deacon, when a young man. Married three times. Brother Miller chose law as a profession and was successful. Yet he always had time to attend church and help hold a meeting. His life was a success. He enjoyed religion, lived happy and died in the faith. His membership was in Clark Circuit when he died. He was a loyal Methodist and died in the faith. May his living children be as faithful as their father. His pastor, D. D. Warlick.

More About JOSEPH WILSON MILLER:  Occupation: Reverend / lawyer (Source: Cynthia Forde; Robert E Miller.)

Notes for "SALLIE" SARAH DAVIS:

The name listed in the Obituary was Mary J. The name was also listed as Mary E on the 1870 Arkansas census - age 34 born in North Carolina. Sallie must be a nickname

More About "SALLIE" SARAH DAVIS:

Census Info:

  • Look in the Ark 1870 census

Notes for ANNIE E MCCULHUM:

Census Info:

1880 Arkansas, Clark Co. Arkadelphia Twp, page 466B

Children of JOSEPH MILLER and "SALLIE" DAVIS are:

15. i. MARY JANE5 MILLER, b. October 1, 1853, Rising Fawn, Dade Co, Georgia; d. March 22, 1873.

ii. "IBBY" NANCY ELIZABETH MILLER, b. April 1855, Dade Co, Georgia (Source: Cynthia Forde; Robert E Miller.); d. 1929, Polk Co, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.).

Census Info:

1880 Arkansas, Clark Co. Arkadelphia Twp, page 466B

  • Nannie remained single.

iii. JOHN WILLIAM MILLER, b. 1858, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde; Robert E Miller.).

Children of JOSEPH MILLER and MARY WARD are:

iv. ALICE5 MILLER, b. January 1861, Malvern, Hot Springs Co, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde; Robert E Miller.); d. 1947, Hot Springs Co, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.); m. SR MCNUTT, September 24, 1890 (Source: Cynthia Forde; Robert E Miller.).

Census Info:

1880 Arkansas, Clark Co. Arkadelphia Twp, page 466B

Notes from Robert E Miller say:

Alice married and lived in a stately home in Arkadelphia, Arkansas. Home is now a museum.

(I'm not sure where they found out this information. Shirley Dumais sent me an email saying she lived in that home and it was not a museum - Kathy Bolam)

Marriage Notes for ALICE MILLER and SR MCNUTT:  Alice married and lived in a stately home in Arkadelphia, Arkansas. The home is now a museum.

v. "ELLA" LUELLA MILLER, b. February 1868, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde; Robert E Miller.).

Census Info:

1880 Arkansas, Clark Co. Arkadelphia Twp, page 466B

  • Luella remained single.

vi. "WARD" FRANK WARD MILLER, b. July 1870, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.); d. January 6, 1933 (Source: Cynthia Forde.); m. ALICE THOMPSON (Source: Cynthia Forde.).

Census Info:

1880 Arkansas, Clark Co. Arkadelphia Twp, page 466B

Information from Cynthia Forde:

Obituary: Clark Co, Arkansas Genealogy Library

The many friends of Professor and Mrs. Frank Ward Miller will be grieved to learn of the death of their only child, which occurred at Malvern on Monday night. Mrs. Miller had been in a hospital at St. Louis for several weeks and Frank Ward had been staying with his aunts Misses Nannie and Ella Miller at Malvern. He caught the dread disease diphtheria and died before it was realized that he was dangerously ill. Dr. McCallum was called to his bedside Monday, but it was too late for them to do anything for the little sufferer. It was intended to bury the remains here, but because diphtheria is so contagious, this was not allowed, so the funeral was held at Malvern on Tuesday and the little body laid to rest there. Professor Miller left at once for St. Louis to break the sad news to his wife. Frank was just five years old. 12/04/02.

 

6. "BETTY" ELIZABETH ANN4 MILLER (JOHN3, JAMES2, JOHN1) was born June 7, 1832 in Monroe Co, Tennesee (Source: Cynthia Forde.), and died April 24, 1850 in Dade Co, Georgia (Source: Cynthia Forde.). She married CASPER MARION TATUM in Rising Fawn, Georgia (Source: Cynthia Forde.). He was born August 27, 1828 in Monroe Co, Tennesee (Source: Cynthia Forde.), and died October 7, 1891 in Dade Co, Georgia (Source: Cynthia Forde.).

  • More About "BETTY" ELIZABETH ANN MILLER:  Burial: Miller Cemetery, Rising Fawn, Georgia (Source: Cynthia Forde.)

Notes for CASPER MARION TATUM:

Census Info:

1880 Georgia, Dade Co. Mill Twp, Page 29B

Child of "BETTY" MILLER and CASPER TATUM is:

16. i. NANCY LOUISE5 TATUM, b. April 10, 1850, Dade Co, Georgia; d. December 20, 1918, Board Camp, Arkansas.

 

7. GEORGE RUSSELL4 MILLER (JOHN3, JAMES2, JOHN1) was born August 7, 1834 in Monroe Co, Tennesee (Source: Cynthia Forde.), and died December 4, 1903 in Polk Co, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.). He married MARTHA JANE DAVIS 1853 in Dade Co, Georgia (Source: Cynthia Forde.), daughter of WILLIAM DAVIS and MARGARET ?. She was born February 3, 1840 in Tennessee (Source: Cynthia Forde.), and died August 28, 1901 in Polk Co, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.).

  • More About GEORGE RUSSELL MILLER:  Burial: Cherry Hill, Mena, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.)

Census Info:

1850 Georgia, Dade Co. District 21, household 169 line 8

1880 Texas, Comanche Co., ED34, Page 152B

  • Look for Polk Co, Arkansas Census 1870

Information from Cynthia Forde:  GEORGE RUSSELL MILLER

The material is from the Family Record of the Bible... copy given to Dorothy Miller, AR by a granddaughter of George's.

George R. Miller, and his wife, Martha Jane Davis were the parents of nine children. George is remembered in Goodspeed's Biographical and Historical Memoirs of Western Arkansas, 1891 for his active role in Arkansas politics.

Coy Clifton Miller remembered his uncle, George, when Geo. pulled out a large box of confederate money and offered the young Coy a huge fistful of it. Much to his chagrin, he learned the money had no value.

Polk Co, Arkansas Census 1870

MILLER, George R. 35 TN

Martha 30., TN

Margret 13, GA

John 11, TX

Ann, 7, AR

Martha, 4, AR

Julia, 8/4 AR

Comanche Co, Texas, Census 1880

MILLER, George, 54, TN

Martha, 40, TN

John, 20, TX,

Julia, 10,

Jackson,

Database: Western Arkansas Biographies and Historical Memoirs page 487

George R. Miller is the capable assessor of Montgomery Co, Ark., but by calling is a tiller of the soil, being the owner of 220 acres of valuable land. He was born in Monroe Co, East Tenn., in 1834, the fourth of nine children born to the union of John Miller and Nancy Wilson, their marriage taking place in Monroe Co, Tenn., their births having occurred in South Carolina and Tennessee in 1803 and 1805, respectively. When the subject of this sketch was two years of age they went to Georgia, and there made their home until 1859, when they came to Polk Co, Ark., where Mrs. Miller passed from life in 1866, and Mr. Miller in 1878, both having been Methodists for some years, though formerly Presbyterians. Mr. Miller was a substantial farmer and served as Co and probate judge in Dade Co, Ga., for some time while residing there. His father, James Miller, died in South Carolina, an Irishman by descent. The mother's father, Joseph Wilson, died in Macon, Ga., a trader and farmer. George R. Miller was given the education and rearing that is usually given the farmer's boy, and in 1853 was married to Martha J., daughter of William and Margaret Davis, who were born in North Carolina in 1787 and 1803, respectively, their marriage taking place in Jackson Co, Ala. From there they moved to Dade Co, Ga., in 1840, where Mr. Davis died in 1852, a farmer by occupation, his widow passing from life in Polk Co, Ark., in 1872. Mrs. Miller first saw the light of day in Tennessee in 1840, and by Mr. Miller became the mother of nine children, two sons and three daughters now living. In 1858 Mr. Miller removed to Texas, but in 1860 came to Polk Co, Ark., and in 1878 returned to Texas, where he spent seven more years. At the end of this time he returned to Polk Co, Ark., and the following year came to Montgomery Co. He followed merchandising [p.487] in Dallas for some five years, and for some time operated a steam mill in Polk Co. In 1861 he joined Company H, Fourth Arkansas Infantry, and for about two years operated in Arkansas, afterward joining the Seventeenth Tennessee, with which he served for about one year, taking part in the engagement at Hoover's Gap. In 1872 he was elected sheriff of Polk Co, Ark., having previously served as deputy six years, and made one of the most zealous and faithful officers the Co has ever had. He was justice of the peace in Texas, and in 1890 was elected assessor of Montgomery Co, Ark., a position he is still filling. He is a member of Cherry Hill Lodge No. 228 of the A. F. & A. M., and for a long time was junior deacon of Dallas Lodge. He has been a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church from boyhood, and is a stanch Democrat in his political views.

Notes for MARTHA JANE DAVIS:

Census Info:

1880 Texas, Comanche Co., ED34, Page 152B

Children of GEORGE MILLER and MARTHA DAVIS are:

i. MARGARET J5 MILLER, b. September 28, 1856 (Source: Cynthia Forde.); d. February 9, 1877 (Source: Cynthia Forde.).

ii. JOHN D MILLER, b. August 21, 1859, Texas (Source: Cynthia Forde.); d. May 5, 1929 (Source: Cynthia Forde.); m. LOU TAYLOR (Source: Cynthia Forde.).

Census Info:

1880 Texas, Comanche Co., ED34, Page 152B

iii. GEORGANN MILLER, b. March 8, 1863 (Source: Cynthia Forde.); d. August 19, 1871 (Source: Cynthia Forde.).

iv. MATTIE MILLER, b. May 18, 1866 (Source: Cynthia Forde.); d. August 12, 1877 (Source: Cynthia Forde.).

v. JULIA REVELLIE MILLER, b. August 21, 1869, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.); d. January 13, 1949 (Source: Cynthia Forde.); m. WILL PHILPOT (Source: Cynthia Forde.).

Census Info:

1880 Texas, Comanche Co., ED34, Page 152B

More About WILL PHILPOT:  Occupation: Doctor (Source: Cynthia Forde.)

vi. RAVILIA BELL MILLER, b. October 4, 1872 (Source: Cynthia Forde.); d. September 14, 1875 (Source: Cynthia Forde.).

vii. JURUTI BELLE MILLER, b. October 19, 1875 (Source: Cynthia Forde.); d. September 1901 (Source: Cynthia Forde.); m. COBB MILLS (Source: Cynthia Forde.).

viii. "JACKSON" JACK PAGE MILLER, b. March 6, 1876, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.); d. July 11, 1900 (Source: Cynthia Forde.).

Census Info:

1880 Texas, Comanche Co., ED34, Page 152B

ix. LULA MILLER, b. June 30, 1880 (Source: Cynthia Forde.); d. August 8, 1962 (Source: Cynthia Forde.); m. ROBERT DURHAM, 1907 (Source: Cynthia Forde.).

x. MOLLIE JOE MILLER, b. December 7, 1884 (Source: Cynthia Forde.); d. April 19, 1934 (Source: Cynthia Forde.); m. CART HARRISON (Source: Cynthia Forde.).

 

8. MARY JANE4 MILLER (JOHN3, JAMES2, JOHN1) was born March 22, 1837 in Rising Fawn, Georgia (Source: Cynthia Forde; Robert E Miller.), and died November 10, 1899 in Board Camp, Polk Co, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.). She married (1) NATHAN STAFFORD (Source: Cynthia Forde.). She married (2) W.M. RANDOLPH May 15, 1884 in Polk Co, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.).

  • More About MARY JANE MILLER:  Burial: Board Camp, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.)

Census Info:

1850 Georgia, Dade Co. District 21, household 169 line 8

1880 Arkansas, Polk Co. Fulton Twp, page 549B

  • Look for 1870 Polk Co Arkansas Fulton Twp house 449

Information from Cynthia Forde:

W. M. Randolph and Mary married May 15, 1884, They had no children. Mary died November 10, 1899., She is buried at Board Camp with a Grave Marker. No grave marker found for W. M. Randolph. But believe he lived until the 1900's.

Child of MARY MILLER and NATHAN STAFFORD is:

17. i. GEORGIANN DIERA5 STAFFORD, b. September 18, 1877, Board Camp, Arkansas; d. December 20, 1913, Board Camp, Arkansas.

 

9. JOHN THORNTON4 MILLER (JOHN3, JAMES2, JOHN1) was born October 14, 1839 in Rising Fawn, Georgia (Source: Cynthia Forde.), and died 1921 in Polk Co, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.). He married (1) SARAH L RUSSELL December 1860 (Source: Cynthia Forde.). She was born 1843 in Charleston, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.), and died 1875 in Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.). He married (2) JOAN COTTON December 7, 1876 in Eggor, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.). She was born October 7, 1852 in Senatobia, Mississippi (Source: Cynthia Forde.), and died 1927 in Idabel, Oklahoma (Source: Cynthia Forde.).

Census Info:

1850 Georgia, Dade Co. District 21, household 169 line 8

1880 Arkansas, Polk Co. Mountain Twp, page 563D

  • Look for 1870 Polk Co Arkansas Mountain Twp house 96

Information from Cynthia Forde:

JOHN THORNTON MILLER  by Donald Miller  1839-1923

My grandfather on my father's side was 75 years old when I was born in 1914. And it was in that year that he wrote an autobiographical sketch, here enclosed. John Thornton Miller was number 6 in a family of 9 children born to John (James) and Mary Wilson Miller. Little is known of his father and mother except that they were possibly married in Eastern Tennessee and moved to Dade Co, GA in the late 1830'[s where John (James) obtained some 400 acres of land presumably as a result of the Cherokee Land Lottery when the Cherokee Indians were displaced to Indian Territory (Oklahoma). It is known that John (James) Miller sold his land in GA in 1859, and with his eldest son, James, displaced to Arkansas.

If you read the autobiography enclosed herewith you will note that grandfather Miller was a farmer, a circuit riding preacher and a populist politician, most of these pursuits occurring in the state of Arkansas. At the outbreak of the Civil War, he was in his early twenties, at which time he was in GA and had married. The war period is hardly mentioned in his autobiography, possibly because he abhorred killing for whatever the reason. I do recall, though, when I was about 7 years old, hearing him tell of his experiences at Champion's Hill near Vicksburg, Mississippi. He recalled, as I sat by his knee, that he saw the 'bluecoats' coming up the slope and his officers were shouting for him to shoot. He said he shut his eyes and fired, hoping no one would be hit. It was after that battle in 1863 that the Confederates withdrew to Vicksburg where they endured 42 days of siege before surrendering to Grant's forces. Records found in the Dade Co, GA. History Book, printing 1975 show that John T. Miller was a private in the 34th BA. Vol. Infantry of the Army of Tennessee, CSA. After capture at Vicksburg, he was released and he returned to GA or Alabama to marry his first wife.

My father is the 'high spirited and ambitious" Joseph Jones, Grandpa Miller writes of in his sketch. John Thornton Miller, it seems, treated his son, Joe J. Miller, better than he had been treated by his father, as regards education and the pursuit of it. John T. was a self taught man and judging from what I have read of his writing, he taught himself well. An avid reader was he and my father, his son, inherited the trait, but with the advantage of a college education. I am led to believe that because of an early refusal of his father to send him to "Trenton Academy" John T. Miller was somewhat estranged from his father. This also seems borne out to some degree when his father came out to Arkansas in 1859/60 where John T. Miller was living with his older brother. John T. almost immediately left and returned to GA. He was married shortly thereafter in GA or AL., so this may have contributed to his hasty departure from Arkansas.

In 1860, John T. Miller married an Alabama girl named Sarah Russell. This first union produced five children, three boys and two girls, the girls being the older of the five. I recall meeting the three sons, Wallace, Gip, and Vernon, when I was about 11 or 12 years old. Gip is known to have lived in Texas around Sweetwater while Wallace and Vernon are believed to have lived in Arkansas. In 1878, Grandpa Miller's first wife died and the following year he married Joan Cotton Lackey, my Grandmother Miller. She bore him 4 sons: Marvin Cotton (died young), Joe (my father), and Bob (Robert F.), the youngest.

ADDENDA (December 1992)

I have attempted to find information on John T. Miller's grandparents to little avail. The 1850 census, the first in the US to list names of members of families shows that John T. Miller's father was named John and not James as my father seemed to think. But, since John T.'s father was born in 1803 in Charleston Co SC, and was thought to be James, it may be assumed that his father was named James. This would be John T.'s grandfather. There were three James Milers in the 1800 census in Charleston Co as heads of households; there were none in the census of 1810, so James and his wife and children must have moved, I believe to Tennessee where sometime in the mid 1820's his son John (James) married the Tennessee girl, Mary (Nancy) Wilson. I have made inquiries to Monroe Co, TN, but have not as yet received any information, thinking I might get some information on John (James Miller's parents. It is believed that his father died early.

GENEALOGICAL RESEARCH

JOHN (JAMES) MILLER, B. December 25, 1803, Charleston Co, SC

Possible fathers of:

James A. Miller b. 1748, No. Ireland. Came to US in 1783 (age 35)

In 1820 census, one year before his death, he shows 7 children. 1 male between 10 and 16 years of age, still in Charleston Co. He was 72 years old. He died on April 19, 1821. This 16 year old son could have been John Miller. Being the youngest son he may have left for GA thereafter. But being the youngest son, it seems unlikely that his name would have been the same as his father.

There was a James Miller in the 1850 census of Walker Co, Ga (from which came Dade Co, GA.) In 1850, John Thornton Miller, my grandfather would have been 10 or 11 years old. He was the 6th child of 9 born to John Miller, the subject of this research.

There were three John Millers in the 1800 census of Charleston Co, SC, one of whom was over 45 years old that year; another had 7 children and was himself listed as between 26 and 45. One of the sons in 1800, 2 were under ten years of age. This was John F. Miller and there was a John F. or John A. Miller listed in the 1850 census of Dade Co, Ga. So conceivably one of the sons under 10 in the earlier census would have been John, the subject of this research. To make this plausible, there would need to be a mistake by a year in the birth of John Miller.

The next step is to trace the three Millers who show up in the GA census of 1850, two in Walker Co and one (John) in Dade Co. The only James seems to be in Walker Co in 1850, which belies what my grandfather writes of his early years being in Dade Co. But this seems to be my next step.

I had hoped to find some record of birth in the Old Scottish Presbyterian Church in Charleston but all records were burned in an 1850 fire there.

Donald Miller.

 

JOHN THORNTON MILLER -

Enlisted as a private in Co. K. 10th Regt. Ga State Troops Dec. 16, 1861, Mustered out May 1862. Enlisted as a private in Co. F 34th Regt. GA. Inf. May 17, 1862, Captured at Vicksburg, Mississippi, Jury 4, 1863, and paroled there on July 8, 1863.

Record from 34th Regiment Georgia Volunteer infantry, C. S. A.

John Thornton married Sarah L. Russell who was born in NE Alabama in 1840. They were married in Alabama on January 2, 1860. They lived in GA and moved to Charleston, Arkansas where Sarah died in 1875. Canzada died in Shreveport, LA. Josephine died in Eastland Co, Desdemoya, Texas. Gip died at Spur, Texas in 1941. Wallace died at Puebla. Colorado in 1845. Vernon died at Pasadena, Texas in 1954.

John Thornton Miller served in the Arkansas State Legislature and was a gubernatorial candidate in the State of Arkansas.

He was the author of an autobiography which is due to be published in the Dade Co Historical Book.

More About JOHN THORNTON MILLER:

  • Elected: 1892, Legislature (Source: (1) Dave Rambo, The Descendants of Peter Gunnarson Rambo, GEDCOM download., (2) MillerWorksSept.FTW.)
  • Religion: October 1870, Methodist Minister (Source: (1) Dave Rambo, The Descendants of Peter Gunnarson Rambo, GEDCOM download., (2) MillerWorksSept.FTW.)

An Autobiographical Sketch of My Life By John Thornton Miller

April 1st, 1914 – 

The task of writing an autobiographical sketch of my life is requested of me by one of my children - a work had I begun a few years ago would have been much lighter, for then I could see good, and now my eyes are dim and my mind is not so clear, and my memory is so impaired that many incidents I would gladly record will be forgotten.

I was born in the great old state of Georgia. The very name is precious to me, and I still love not only the name of the state, but the Co of Dade, and the town of Rising Fawn - now quite a town - on the Chattanooga and Wills Valley Railroad. My mother and father recorded the day of my birth at the 14th day of October, 1839; I being the sixth child, with three brothers and two sisters older, and three brothers younger than I.

The older brothers married and went away, and the farm work and leadership fell on me. The three younger brothers and myself did most of the farm work. What piles of corn and garners of wheat we made! What fine hogs, meat and lard! To get out on the road, or farm, with a fine yoke of oxen and a good wagon was a fine past time. It was fun to load the team and see them get down to pulling. Sometimes I would walk out on the wagon tongue and get astride ‘Old Buck,’ and get ditched. This was not so funny, but it mixed in occasionally.

+++

April 2nd, 1914 –

My father’s farm of 420 acres lay in a little creek, which I shall call Cove Creek, because it drained what was in the early days of that Co called the Lost Cove. Sometimes this stream would get out on our land. It was crooked, and in the crooks the land was very rich. Bill and I called these little crooks ‘newks.’ My, what corn we made in those newks! This Cove Creek emptied into Lookout Creek – a larger stream, and it in turn emptied into the Tennessee River 20 miles below us and at the mouth of the Lookout Valley about eight miles southwest of Chattanooga, to us a big town then. We did our marketing there. Corn, meal, potatoes, and other farm products were hauled there. We did not grow much cotton then except for home use. We had no gins, and had to pick the seed out of the cotton with our fingers. This we usually did after supper before bedtime. And now, children, you may think this is a romance, but it is a fact as sure as you are born. Then mother carded the cotton and made our summer wear. One pair of red leather shoes – homemade, at that –was our share of shoes a year. These we got about the first week of December. We were proud, and ‘stepped high." On these creeks, we boys would fish, and swim, and kill moccasins. I dream of the creeks, and newks, and swimming holes and canebrakes now some nights. They all look just like they did sixty years ago – that is, in dreamland. The old foot-logs, the wash place, the mill over on the bank, the big scaly-bark tree just there by the wash place – I shall never see them again only in dreams.

Well, children, I have said enough about the creeks and the farm. I could write all day of reminiscences of the days spent up and down the creeks, of hairbreadth escapes, snake scares, strangles, and deep wadings. But there are some other matters of which I must tell you. There is Old Pleasant Grove Log Meeting House, and the school a mile away. Professor A.R. Morrison is teaching. He was the best teacher I ever had. The house was a big pine-hewed log house with great cracks. We boys who were in arithmetic would sit out of doors to study, throw stones at the birds, talk and laugh and have a good time generally. Well, the preacher preached in this old house and when it was Circuit Preaching Day, we quit work about ten O’clock in the morning and went to meeting. (I wish the people would do that way now.) The preacher would sometimes come home with us, and Bill and I were always glad, for mother always fixed something good to eat when he came. We would likely have chicken, biscuits, ham and gravy, or sausage and such like.

Somehow, I learned to love the preacher, and that learning has been a habit of my life. I still love a man of God. There have been many changes since those days in the modes of living and acting, but the Word of God has not changed, and the Word is not lost. If I could I would go back there and walk over the old places so sacred to me, made so by the scenes and experiences of my youth. There are mountains there one of which I would balance against all the mountains of Montgomery Co (Arkansas). I desire to stand in the valley of my birth and gaze on those lofty peaks and cliffs! When I was seventeen years old I began to feel the need of an education, and asked my father for the sum of one hundred dollars, which then would pay my way ten months in an academy at Trenton, Ga., the Co seat. Father said, "All right, John, make a big crop this year, and I will send you next year." We made the crop and when we got it harvested, I asked him for the money. He told me that that was more than he had been able to do for the other boys and so put me off. As a result of my disappointment, I started to Texas.

I started from home on the sixth day of October 1858, with my now sainted brother, Joe. As I remember the big comet was in the West. (I wonder – was this Halley’s comet? I think it was.) My brother located in Pike Co, Arkansas. Then moved to Dallas, in Polk Co. He bought the Little John Longacre Farm, now owned by B. F. Thompson. There, Joe’s wife died in September of 1859. Later my father and James, my oldest brother, moved to Polk Co, and in December of 1860, I went back to my native state. I married, there, Miss Sarah L. Russell, a sweet little Christian girl of seventeen summers, with whom I lived sixteen years, having born to us five children –three boys and two girls.

We had passed through the War Between the States, and we moved to Arkansas, settling near Charleston at Hickory Ridge, Sebastian Co. There we buried my wife – leaving me almost a wreck. The sadness and loneliness and sorrow of such an ordeal no one knows except those who have experienced it! Having five small children, their mother gone, poor in worldly things, one hundred miles from and of my people, set me in serious straits. I could not leave my children and I could hardly stay with my children. What could I do? It began to be a serious question and rather difficult to solve. I was then thirty-seven years old. Time sped on. Gloom impenetrable settled down about my home. But the Good Lord always ‘tempers the wind of the shorn lamb.’ So I was married to Mrs. Joan Lackey, with whom I have lived these thirty- seven years happily. She proved to be indeed a wonderful mother to my motherless children and a congenial companion to myself.

+++

May 19th, 1914 –

The longer I live the thoughts of home and home life, home comforts and home influences and training, crowd in on my mind; and now that I am nearing the seventy-fifth mile-post of life’s journey I am thoroughly convinced that for a boy or a girl there is not and cannot be any other influence so great as the home. I fear sometimes that our American home life is falling down in the very essentials at the outset of education.

The home may be poor and destitute of the luxuries of life. But it is home –sweet old word! Not many words in our language so precious – in fact no word so sweet except, perhaps, the word ‘mother.’ Mother! The sweetest thought trembling down the path of life! The crowning though of home!

I recall an incident occurring on my trip from Georgia to Texas, in 1858, near Tuscumbia, Alabama. In our tent some time in the night I awoke. I was sick, oh, so sick I did not know that I could ever get well. I thought I might die in the night. Yet my mind was clear and the past years of my life passed in review –my home, my brother Bill who had been my play-mate, my chum, my yoke-fellow in the fields, in the creeks, in the squirrel hung, in the fishing days. The farm work and the manifold duties of a farmer boy all passed in my mind. Oh, if I could only be with my mother, dear sweet old soul, and say to her, "Mother, I am sick." And hear her say, "You will be better in the morning, my boy," and have her put her sweet old hand on my forehead and bend down and kiss me. But the spell passed and we drove on and on to the great West. But, my dear mother, I can never forget your kindness, and when I get HOME-thank God for the word! I trust that I shall be allowed to see you. I shall there try to make amends for all the heartaches I have caused you. I know now that all will be forgiven me.

When but a child I would follow my dear mother to the big spring at nightfall to get water for the night. After dipping the pail in the water and lifting it our, she would sit down and say, "Son, let’s pray.’ So she would pray and I would sit and look into her old wrinkled face and hear her whispering to God about us children and pleading for us. Well, thank God for a praying mother! These memories and environments of home, the preaching, the Sunday Schools, the religious meetings; these made on my mind and in my soul impressions for everlasting good. So the thought of religion and getting home to Heaven became the absorbing themes of my life. From my earliest recollections, I had no other thought than that I would become a Christian and live for God and heaven. And often when alone I would plead with him to permit me to be a Christian, but I always had such a sense of my unworthiness, as always to be afraid He would not allow me to be saved. And these thought were horrible to me, to think I should be lost – how could I bear it? But these awful experiences were all the while leading me up to the feet of Jesus, where I could look up through my tears to the Great Face of a loving Savior and receive His smiles and His pardoning love. When I came to the place where He showed me that He did not save people because they were good, but because they were bad like I was, it was easy for me. Thank God, Jesus came to save sinners, and not the righteous!

+++

May 20th, 1914 –

I sought and received the forgiveness of my sins in August 1861, at a camp meeting at Bird’s Chapel, in Dade Co, Georgia. My conversion was so definite – I may say, so sweet and so satisfactory –followed by so great peace - which I could never be made to doubt that I was reconciled to God. My consecration was so full as not to leave a hoof behind. I immediately erected a family altar, and while it has been a rule of my life to keep up family worship, we have neglected it at times, to our great spiritual loss. Soon after my conversation or even before, I felt impressed that I should preach the Gospel and asked the church after a few years, for license to preach; and in October, 1870, the Quarterly conference gave me the license. Timidly, I undertook work as a local preacher. I always wanted to join the conference and be a traveling preacher and spend my whole time in the work. But I did not join the traveling connection. I have done what I could as a local preacher. In May 1876, bishop Wightman ordained me as a local deacon at Russellville, Arkansas. I have don some little supply work, and feel now that I should have joined the Conference, yet I may not be entirely to blame for not doing so. And now the day is far spent and I am in the evening of my of my life, and the results of my work are with the Great Head of the church. Amen.

Well, (again looking back) the war was now over, the south subdued and our entire Southland almost all devastated, the people poor and discouraged. I am at Lavergne, Tennessee, on the Nashville and Chattanooga, Railroad, sixteen miles from Nashville, in a great country – with only $500.00, which we have saved in the last year. I have been at work for the United States government at pretty good wages; have traded, run the blockade from Nashville, and sold to Negroes such little things as I could get out of Nashville undetected. My wife and my two girl babies compose my family. My brother, George, who lived in Arkansas was with us. He persuaded us to return with him to Arkansas. So about the 15th of July 1865, we hired a man to take us to Nashville – gave him $5.00 for the trip. At Nashville we got aboard a steamboat, and went down the Cumberland River to Smithland, thence down the Tennessee River into the Ohio thence down the Ohio to Cairo, Illinois. We there took the big boat, "Ben Stickney," and ran down the Mississippi to Napoleon, where we took the Glide No. 3, for Little Rock, Arkansas. At Little Rock we purchased a wagon and team and moved overland to Polk Co, arriving at my father’s farm on August 1st.

Our people were all poor now and in a hard shape financially. So we had to begin at the bottom with only a few dollars in cash, and our living to buy. I did not like Arkansas, and thought I would go back to Tennessee, but George always influenced me, and we stayed. So we are here yet. I got hold of a hew hogs, a pony, a cow, a bull-tongue plow, a sprouting hoe – and went to work. I would turn the pony out on the grass with a bell on. We would hunt him in the mornings. We had no bedsteads, except scaffolds pinned to the wall. We lived three miles from Shady Grove Church and schoolhouse. There we went to church, where the Rev. W. Wakely baptized me and received me into the M.E. Church, South.

I worked hard and saved as much as possible. We lived a rather hard but happy life. We were 150 miles from a railroad and market. That first fall I went to Center Point and bought two bales of cotton, and took it to Little Rock. Sold it for 36 cents a pound. Bought a few supplies – a barrel of salt for $6.50, a pair of cotton cards at $2.00, some little Oznaburge at 60 cents a yard, a little coffee at 60 cents a pound. I was gone three weeks on the trip. I began to get acquainted, and secured a little school to teach at a little log cabin where the village of silver Center now is. Wade Hilton had a little water mill just down on the creek. Sometimes we could get some corn ground and when the creek was low, he could not grind. The next nearest mill was on Big Fork, ten miles away. We would go down there and stay all night. Maybe we would get a peck of meal and maybe not. We would grit the corn and make hominy, but we would scrape about some way to keep from starving. There was not a steam mill in the whole Co, a Co that was sixty mile long and fifty miles wide. There were not more than three hundred voters in the whole Co. How is that for neighbors? Game was plentiful. Anybody could kill a deer if he could shoot. I could not see them until they had left me. Cattle could be bought cheaply. We would dry the beef and it would answer for meat and bread. Acorns were plentiful and the hogs would thrive on them. We did not feed the cattle. They would live through the winter on the range. Was I what you would call a pioneer? No, there were then old settlers. I could name a few of them, but there is not need. I write these little details down to impress on you boys some of the troubles and trials through which the older generation has gone in order that you may be a little happier and a little better. I soon moved to Pike Co and bought a place on the Little Missouri River. Kept it two years and sold it, moving back to Polk Co. But in Pike Co, my oldest son, Gip, was born, and he being our first boy, we thought him the finest of all boys. Well, he grew up, was a good boy, industrious, tenderhearted, a young man of good sense and well balanced, but he did not have the chance to go to school.

Back again in Polk Co, I bought a farm on the Washita River from brother George, and paid him $1000.00 for it. I lived on it three years, and sold it to Barry Vaught, and moved again. Well, I have never been satisfied and have moved around a great deal. Had I been still I might have saved more of the world’s goods, but, "The soul seeks creation through trying something new." The only reason I have not seen the world over is that I have not had the money on which to travel.

Our next boy was one we called Wallace Gladwin, a fine little fellow and quick to learn, growing up to be an excellent schoolteacher, and today his whole talk is ‘school, school, school’.

Going back a little in time, while I was in Pike Co, I was made a Mason at Dallas Lodge No. 128. I was zealous for the institution for a long time, and have had active participation in its teachings, but it seems now that through this country the time-honored order is way-worn and heavy laden Unscrupulous men have crept into its portals and the great light is being dimmed by men who do not strictly adhere strictly to the great teachings. I write it down here that no institution among men can live and prosper to success only as it is related to Jesus Christ. The church itself will die if she cuts loose from Christ. There is life and power from nowhere else.

In 1870, leaving home I took a trip to Texas after my wife’s mother, Mrs. Russell, who lived with Col. A. A. Hughes, a gentleman who married my wife’s oldest sister and lived in Travis Co on the Colorado River near Austin. I came back to Lampasas Springs and by Gatesville. Well, I had a time in the black mud. I did not like Texas. It was so sticky and everybody cursed. I would camp by myself. I had no weapons except my Bible and hymnbook. I would sing a song and pray by my fire before going to bed, and ask God’s care over me and my property through the night. I had no bad luck on the trip of 1000 miles. I praise the Lord for His care, and I think I shall always keep the faith. But for his mercies, I should have been in eternal despair. Pardon me for my so frequent allusion to the phase of my life. Someone has said, "In Italy all roads lead to Rome," so in this life of mine all thoughts lead to God.

Mrs. Russell did not like Arkansas and I had to send her back to Texas, at a cost of $65.00 – at that time quite a little sum of money. And money was a very much-needed luxury. For about this time some of the children needed to be placed in school; and right here is the great problem of the family. To rear a family and not educate the individuals of it is a calamity to the children and a curse to the world. So I began to cast about as to how to have the children trained. There were no very good schools in reach, and the system of free schools had just been set up and was not in good running order yet. So to educate a family of some size was no little task.

(This paper is so soft and spongy that I cannot write longer with a pen, so I shall have to do the remainder with a pencil.)

Vernon was my next boy. He was quite a little fellow, and is still small. But he has grown up to be a good substantial businessman, and somewhat of a moneymaker. He is the baby boy of my first wife. The girls have grown up and married. The first born of my union to Mrs. Joan Lackey was a fine boy. We gave him the name of Marvin, for one of our great bishops. He was a good spirit and we admired him very much. But at the age of 18 he passed away and brought to our home and hearts the saddest day of our lives. But I know God knows best, and I submit.

I began to sell goods and made some money at it and helped my younger boys about going to school. John Cotton, our next oldest to Marvin, is a fine judge of human nature and of men. He is absolutely honest and despises a falsehood or the one guilty of falsehood. The next one, Eddie, was stillborn. Then came Joseph Jones, high spirited and ambitious and quick of perception, graduated from Ouachita College and studied in the University of Chicago, and has developed into a good schoolteacher. Last, but not the least, coming to our home was Robert Franklin, our baby. He is the largest of all of them, and a fine fellow. He is at home with us now. He and Cotton are the stay of their mother and father. Don’t you all think this is a pretty good family? All are rather intelligent, all in good health, all happy, and none guilty of crime. It is much to be thankful for.

In 1892, I took quite an active interest in politics. I made speeches in interest of the farmers and laboring people. Having all my life been a democrat, I thought my party and the Republican Party were ignoring the interests of the masses and catering to the classes. I though the time had come for a change in the political complexion of our country, so I took up the cause of the Populist Party and was elected to represent Polk Co in the Legislature in 1893, and again in 1895. My opponents were outstanding leaders of the whiskey and gambling ring, which has since been demonstrated by the untimely death of the man I had the honor of beating. We had a stormy season in 1893. In 1895, I introduced the first bill to prohibit the manufacture and sale of intoxicating liquors in the state. Of course, it failed to pass.

Notes for JOAN COTTON:

Census Info:

1880 Arkansas, Polk Co. Mountain Twp, page 563D

Information from Cynthia Forde:

From: "Sara Trulock" <sunshyne@telepath.com>

To: "Cynthia Forde" <cynthia.forde@worldnet.att.net>

Subject: Re: Joan (Cotton) Lackey...

Date: Saturday, December 16, 2000 12:07 AM

Cynthia,

Glad it arrived safely. <grin> Let me know if you have any questions. And thanks; I look forward to receiving it! <smile>

BTW - you can put George Lackey for the father of Richard. I've been doing work (with the "assistance" of another cousin) on the line, and found Richard with father George in 1850 & 1860 Arkansas. And, I'm fairly sure I have a lead on his mother, too, although she's deceased by 1850. There's a Lackey in the 1850 Arkansas mortality schedules, so am writing to my cousin Russell (who works at the Arkansas History commission) and he said he'd check it out for me.

Sara

Children of JOHN MILLER and SARAH RUSSELL are:

18. i. CANZADA JANE5 MILLER, b. November 2, 1862; d. September 18, 1903, Shreveport, Louisiana or Detroit, Red River, Texas.

ii. MARTHA JOSEPHINE MILLER, b. May 6, 1865, Tennessee (Source: Cynthia Forde.); d. Eastland Co, Desdemoya, Texas (Source: Cynthia Forde.); m. DANIEL B DAVIS, January 8, 1885 (Source: Cynthia Forde.).

Census Info:

1880 Arkansas, Polk Co. Mountain Twp, page 563D

iii. GEORGE GIBSON MILLER, b. May 19, 1868, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.); d. June 13, 1941, Spur, Texas (Source: Cynthia Forde.); m. EMMA JEAN WIMBERLY (Source: Cynthia Forde.).

Census Info:

1880 Arkansas, Polk Co. Mountain Twp, page 563D

iv. WALLACE GLADWIN MILLER, b. December 12, 1870, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.); d. 1945, Puebla, Colorado (Source: Cynthia Forde.).

Census Info:

1880 Arkansas, Polk Co. Mountain Twp, page 563D

Could this be William age 8 in 1880 census?

v. VERNON MILLER, b. August 4, 1873, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.); d. 1954, Pasadena, Texas (Source: Cynthia Forde.); m. VINNIE KELLY (Source: Cynthia Forde.).

Census Info:

1880 Arkansas, Polk Co. Mountain Twp, page 563D

Listed as Vance in 1880 census

vi. WILLIS MILLER, b. Abt 1874, Arkansas.

Census Info:

1880 Arkansas, Polk Co. Mountain Twp, page 563D

Children of JOHN MILLER and JOAN COTTON are:

vii. MARVIN MUNSEY5 MILLER, b. March 4, 1878, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.).

Census Info:

1880 Arkansas, Polk Co. Mountain Twp, page 563D

Listed as Madison in 1880 census

viii. JOHN COTTON MILLER, b. January 31, 1883 (Source: Cynthia Forde.).

ix. EDWIN MILLER, b. August 22, 1885 (Source: Cynthia Forde.).

19. x. JOSEPH JONES MILLER, b. July 31, 1888, Rural Arkansas; d. 1970.

xi. ROBERT FRANKLIN MILLER, b. January 12, 1897 (Source: Cynthia Forde.).

 

10. WILLIAM ANDERSON4 MILLER (JOHN3, JAMES2, JOHN1) was born February 25, 1842 in Rising Fawn, Georgia (Source: Cynthia Forde; Robert E Miller.), and died June 18, 1915 in Board Camp, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.). He married (1) MARTHA MINERVA BELLE FLEMING September 4, 1864 in Mena, Polk Co, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.). She was born May 12, 1846 in White City, Tennessee (Source: Cynthia Forde; Robert E Miller.), and died July 29, 1884 in Mena or Silver City, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.). He married (2) REBECCA JARRETT MCDONALD December 2, 1886 in Greenwood, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.). She was born August 24, 1858 in Montgomery Co, Alabama (Source: Cynthia Forde.), and died February 3, 1938 in Mena, Polk Co, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.).

  • More About WILLIAM ANDERSON MILLER:  Burial: Unknown, Cherry Hill Cemetery, Polk Co. Arkansas
  • More About MARTHA MINERVA BELLE FLEMING:  Burial: Cherry Hill, Mena, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.)
  • More About REBECCA JARRETT MCDONALD:  Burial: Unknown, Liberty Cemetery, Greenwood, Arkansas

Census Info:

1850 Georgia, Dade Co. District 21, household 169 line 8

1880 Arkansas, Polk Co. Fulton Twp, page 552D

1900 Arkansas, Polk Co. Fulton Twp, household 41 line 14

In 1900 census, living with daughter Etta and marked as divorced

  • Look in the Ark 1870 census, Polk Co, center twp, Dallas post office) (Source: Robert E Miller.)

William A Miller was a farmer.

This information was collected from the 1870 Polk Co - center township - Dallas post office. We are not really sure if this William Miller is our relative but his age fits, also his place of residence, Dallas, Arkansas.

Information from Cynthia Forde:

WILLIAM ANDERSON MILLER b. February 25, 1842 Rising Fawn, Dade Co, GA -- d. June 15, 1915 Boardcamp, Polk Co, AR.

William Anderson Miller was the son of John Miller who was born in 1803 in Tennessee and his wife, Nancy Mary Wilson b. 1806 in TN. He grew up in the beautiful Rising Fawn, Dade Co region of GA. His father was a farmer, and circuit judge. William moved with his parents to Polk Co, AR in 1859. William Anderson Miller was married twice: The first marriage was to Minerva Ann Fleming, born May 12, 1846, White Co, TN, daughter of Alfred P. and Nancy Hitchcock Fleming. William and Minerva married on September 4, 1864 in Mena, Polk Co, AR.

William bought some land around Cherry Hill on the Ouchita River where ten children were born to he and Minerva.

Joseph A., James M., Etta Tennessee, Nancy E., Maud, Roland Douglas, Anna May, Laura C., Frank, William Abe

Five of these children, Anna, Nancy E., Laura, Bill Abe, and Betty, all passed away at an early age due to fever thought to be brought on by mosquito bites. They are buried in the Miller plot with Coy Miller, in the Cherry Hill cemetery east of Mena, Polk Co, Arkansas. William A. Miller's first wife, mother Manerva, is buried there as well. After the death of so many children, John, William's dad sold him some land so they moved away from the river to Board Camp.

Born to William Anderson Miller and second wife, Rebecca McDonald Johnston, were Fannie Retha, who married James Looney, and Coy C. Miller who married Ruby King. Rebecca is buried at Greenwood, Arkansas near her third husband, Sam House. Retha had two daughters, Eloise and Helen. She is buried in Tuscon, Arizona. It is believed that Retha had two children with her first husband.

He is listed in the 1880 census of Polk Co, Arkansas.

William, age 38, born in Ga. Father and Mother, born in Tennessee

Manerva Fleming Miller, age 34, born in Tennessee, both father and mother born in Tennessee

1. Joe, age 16, born in Arkansas

2. James M. , age 12, born in Arkansas

3. Etta Tennessee, age 11, born in Arkansas

4. Betty, age 8, born in Arkansas

5. Maud, age 6, born in Arkansas

6. Roland Douglas, age 4, born in Arkansas

7. Mary, age 3, born in Arkansas

8. Laura, age 2. born in Arkansas

9. Bill Abe, four months, born in Arkansas

1900 Federal Census Polk Co, AR - Fulton Township

Wilcox, Daniel 36 1864 MO, KY NY

Etta 31 1869 AR GA TN

Gretchen E. 4/12 1900 AR MO AR

Miller, Wm. A. 58, 1842 Divorced - Father-in-law GA SC TN

1910 Federal Census Polk Co, AR, Fulton Township  page 114, 70- 76

Wilcox, Daniel F. 46, 15/years MO KY NY

Etta 40 7/4 AR GA TN

Gretchen 10 AR MO AR

Annie 8 """"""

Arthur 6 """"""

Joseph 1 """"""

Miller, William A. 68, Widowed father-in-law GA SC TN

Coy C. Miller 17 Brother in law AR GA AL

WILLIAM ANDERSON MILLER FINALLY RECEIVES HIS CIVIL WAR SERVICE MARKER

"One hundred and twenty four years after he was mustered out of the service, and seventy three years after his death, Confederate Army Veteran William Anderson Miller will finally get his grave marker testifying that he did, indeed, serve in the armed services of the Confederate States of America during the civil war.

Anderson's grave at Cherry Hill has been without a marker since his death in 1915 at the age of 73. It all came about through the efforts of his grandson, Aaron Miller, of 17 Meadowbrook Lane in Mena, while he and his wife were researching their family histories.

A letter to the National Archives and Record Service in Washington, D. C. brought them William Anderson Miller's service record and the necessary forms to fill out for the grave marker.

The record shows that Miller, who was living in Polk Co, apparently joined the Eighth Field Artillery of Arkansas on June 1, 1863 at the age of 21. He later served with a company of the Tennessee Light Artillery commanded by a Captain Scott. He was discharged as a sergeant on September 18, 1864 because of physical disability.

Born in 1842 in Georgia, Miller moved to the Cherry Hill area with his family when he was 16. Following his discharge from the Confederate army, he came back to Cherry Hill and lived there and at Board Camp until his death.

Miller was not the only member of his family to serve with the confederates. He had four brothers in the service. One of them was captured and later apparently killed while being held prisoner at the Johnson Island prisoner of war camp in Ohio. Aaron Miller has been unable to find out more exact details of his death." (Mena Star, Mena, Arkansas, Volume 90, Number 174., 1988)

 

Military service: Bet. 1861 - 1864, Tennessee Light Artillery (Source: (1) Sappingtons.FTW., (2) Dave Rambo, The Descendants of Peter Gunnarson Rambo, GEDCOM download., (3) MillerWorksSept.FTW.)

Occupation: Farmer (Source: (1) Sappingtons.FTW., (2) Dave Rambo, The Descendants of Peter Gunnarson Rambo, GEDCOM download., (3) MillerWorksSept.FTW.)

Religion: Methodist Episcopal (Source: (1) Sappingtons.FTW., (2) Dave Rambo, The Descendants of Peter Gunnarson Rambo, GEDCOM download., (3) MillerWorksSept.FTW.)

Occupation: farmer

Notes for MARTHA MINERVA BELLE FLEMING:

Census Info:

1880 Arkansas, Polk Co. Fulton Twp, page 552D

Notes for REBECCA JARRETT MCDONALD:

Information from Cynthia Forde:

REBECCA JARRETT MCDONALD b. 1857 or 1858 in Birmingham, Montgomery Co, AL to Martha Bankston Brooks and Elijah McDonald. Rebecca's mother, Martha Bankston Brooks, was born in 1834 in Walton Co, GA to Jacob Rutledge Brooks and Rebecca Jarrett Isabella Sappington. Martha married Elijah McDaniel in October 1856 in Walton Co, GA. Elijah was the son of William McDonald/McDaniel and Sarah? . Elijah was born in Talbot Co, GA in 1834.

Rebecca was the oldest of four children born to the McDonalds. There is some confusion about her actual birth date. The following sources list her age differently.

  • 1860 census: 3
  • 1870 census: 13
  • 1880 census: 24
  • 1900 census: 39
  • 1920 census: 59
  • January, 1874 - marriage application: age 15 ( this has to be an error and start of the confusion)
  • Obituary lists her birth year as 1858.
  • Tombstone lists her birth year as 1859.

The birth dates in the 1860 and 1870 census are consistent; they were taken ten years apart by two different census enumerators pointing to a birth date of 1857-8. The inconsistency occurs when her 1874 marriage application lists her age as 15. The 1880 census enumerates her age as 21 which supports the birth date of 1859. Why would anyone subtract years on a marriage application to show an age of 15 when it should be 17? Wouldn't it sound better for a 17 year old to marry a 47 year old man rather than a 15 year old? What would be gained by adding a year or two to the age of a tiny child to give to a census enumerator? There is no question that In later years Rebecca reveals anxiety about her age by subtracting two years when she provides census data. There was not a death record on file to check on those records.

REBECCA'S EARLY LIFE:

It does not take a great deal of imagination to envision Rebecca's early life in Alabama in 1861-1872. Her father, Elijah was in the CSA fighting a terrible war; he was taken prisoner and wounded twice. Her mother, Martha, was on a soldier's pension in Montgomery Co, AL during the war years. Loss was experienced across the board; her uncle Caleb, her mother's favorite brother, died as the result of the war. Another uncle, James, caught smallpox as a prisoner and died also. Her little brother, William, died between 1860 and 1870.

Family stories tell us that the McDonalds migrated to Fort Smith, Arkansas when Rebecca was 13 years old. If the census records of 1860 - 1870 are to be believed, this would have happened after August of 1870. If her death record is correct, the move to AR would have occurred in 1872. We are not certain exactly what route they followed; but, according to Aunt Retha, "my mother was 13 years old when she came up the Arkansas River with her parents on a raft from Montgomery Co, Alabama."

Rebecca was taken in by William T. Johnston and his sister, Martha Elizabeth Johnston. Rebecca married William Tillman Johnston in January of 1874; in July of 1874, her father, Elijah McDonald, married Martha Elizabeth Johnston, sister of William T. Johnston. This made Rebecca and her father in-laws. Will and 'Becky' Johnston had four children, Jimmy, Doscia, Tilman, and Jenny. She was widowed in 1882.

In 1886, Rebecca married another widower, William Anderson Miller from Polk Co, AR, who had been widowed for two years. Adding Rebecca's four small children to Miller's eight children still at home adds up to an even dozen. To add fuel to the fire, Rebecca and Bill had two children of their own. They became the parents of Fannie Retha in 1888 and Coy Clifton Miller in 1892. The marriage lasted 14 years and ended in divorce in 1900. Interestingly enough, the divorce was ignored in Rebecca's obituary.

Rebecca married once again to Samuel D. House in 1900. She moved to live with Sam in his home in Montgomery Co, AR and lived there until he passed away in 1936. At that time, she moved to Mena and lived with her daughter, Retha Miller Looney, who had herself recently been widowed.

OBITUARY FOR REBECCA MCDONALD MILLER HOUSE  

February 10, 1938, Thursday  Mena Star

Mrs. Rebecca House buried Friday.

Funeral services for Mrs. Rebecca Jarrett House, who died Thursday morning at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Retha Looney, were held Friday afternoon at 1:00 at the Looney residence on tenth Street, with the Reverend Chris J. Sias, pastor of the First Christian Church, and the Reb. H. H. McGuyre, pastor of the First Methodist Church officiating. The service was brief, following which the body was taken to Greenwood, the former home of the deceased for burial, which took place at the Liberty Center Cemetery. Arrangements were by the Geyer Funeral Home. The pallbearers were Walter E. Jones, Will Alexander, A.H. Betts, Carl Whisenhart, J. I. Hudgins and Paul Sanders.

Rebecca Jarrett McDonald was born August 24, 1858 near Montgomery, Alabama. At the age of 13, she moved with her parents to Greenwood, AR. In 1874, she was married to William T. Johnston. Soon after the marriage, she joined the Methodist Church of which brotherhood she remained a member until her death. Four children were born to the couple and while they were yet small, Mr. Johnston died.

In 1886, the deceased was married to W.A. Miller. She lived in Polk Co for a number of years. Mr. Miller passed away in 1914. She married Samuel House in later years. His death occurred September 27, 1936. Since that time, Mrs. House has made her home with her daughter in Mena.

Besides Mrs. Looney, Mrs. House is survived by two sons, James Johnston of Ozark and C. C. Miller of El Paso, Texas. One sister, Mrs. S. Paine, McCurtain, OK, seventeen grandchildren, and nine great grandchildren.

DOCUMENTATION FOR REBECCA JARRETT MCDONALD

1860 FEDERAL CENSUS, PIKE Co, AL The McDonald family is enumerated:

Monticello Post Office

Page 185 - Sept. 4, 1860

Family # 1268 / 1286

Elijah McDonald - Age 25 - GA - Farmer

Martha " - " 26 - GA

Rebecca " - " 3 - AL

William J. " - " 2 - AL

1870 FEDERAL CENSUS - BULLOCK Co, AL

Elijah McDaniel -

Martha ""

Rebecca '' 13

Caleb

Laura

(William J. is not listed - he must have died)

MARRIAGE INDEX: Arkansas, 1850-1900

McDonald, Rebecca Spouse : Johnston, William T.

Marriage date : Jan 11, 1874

Co : Sebastian

Gender : Female

Source : Co Court Records

Microfilm Number : 1034032 - 1034044 & 1034073 - 1034075

1880 FEDERAL CENSUS - Sebastian Co, AR -

Johnson, William T. TX AL AL farmer

Rebecca, 21 AL AL AL

Jennie 05 AR AR AR

Doshia 04 AR AR AR

William J. 02 AR AR AR

(note the spelling of the name, Johnson instead of Johnston.)

MARRIAGE INDEX: ARKANSAS, 1850- 1900

MILLER, W. A. Spouse : JOHNSTON, Mrs. R. J.

Marriage date : Dec 2, 1886

Co : Sebastian

Gender : Male

Source : Co Court Records

Microfilm Number : 1034032 - 1034044 & 1034073 - 1034075

Until very recently, no one in the family realized that Rebecca and Wm A Miller divorced sometime between 1892 and 1900.

Memo from Dorothy Miller;

Finally made it to the Fort Smith Library today; Weather was wonderful. The 1910 Sebastain Co/ Center TW was so dim that I could not read it. I believe that they were still in Sebastian Co in 1910... but the census taker missed them. They are in Montgomery Co in 1920... but not in 1910.

W. A. Miller against R. J. Miller Decree

September 7, 1897.

Now on this day of court, this case comes on to be heard and if approving to the court that defendant, R. J. Miller has been duly served by his said server 20 days before the first day of this term of court and that the allegations in plaintiff complaint had been sufficiently sustained by the endeavor of W. A. Miller, Plaintiff and J. H. Gardner.

It is therefore ordered by the judge and decreed by the court that plaintiff have judgement for divorce and be restored to all the rights and privileges of a single and unmarried person.

Below... is a handwritten cc of the same court petition for divorce from WA Miller with Rebecca Miller suing for divorce:

R. J. Miller against W. A. Miller... Granted. etc.

1900 FEDERAL CENSUS - SEBASTIAN Co, Center Twp

Miller, Rebecca widow - 39 1860

James T. Johnston - son - 16 - April 9, 1878 (d. January 1968, Ozark, AR)

Franklin T. Johnston - son - March 1882 (d. April 24, 1914- Sebastian Co, AR ... not married)

Reatha Miller - daughter - 12 - 1888 ( d. abt. 1985 - Tucson, AZ)

Coy C. Miller - son 8 - 1892 (d. 1962 - Mena, AZ)

At some point during this year, Rebecca met and married Sam House on October 18, 1900. She moved to Montgomery Co, AR to live with Samuel Daniel House.

1920 FEDERAL CENSUS - MONTGOMERY Co, AR; Sulphur Township

118/120 House, Samuel D. 62; GA.LA LA

Rebecca J. 59, AL AL AL

Samuel D. House became ill with Alzheimer's Disease; As Rebecca's health declined, she moved to Mena to live with her daughter, Retha, where she lived until her death in 1938. Samuel House died on September 27, 1836. Rebecca is buried in Lot B 40 in Liberty Cemetery, Greenwood, AR... listed as Rebecca Jarrett House. (Someplace along the way... she was assigned the name Jane erroneously... her middle name was Jarrett!) Mother - At Rest. She is buried next to William Tillman Johnston (Father) at peace. (May, 1822 - Feb. 1885.) Buried on the other side of Rebecca was her son, F. Tillman Johnston, d. April 24, 1914.

MEMOS AND REMEMBRANCES FROM LINDA MILLER:

Each story I have been told about her relates a very jolly person! June's daughter Jane Bryant might offer some leads into the life of Aunt Becky from her mother's memories.

Also - Martha Elizabeth (her brother was suppose to be VERY wealthy) but this was told to by my aunt Retha Frisbie "Retha talks during Christmas of 1993 - she remembers her Dad, James Tillman McDonald, telling about how Martha smoked a pipe. "One time she thought she lost her pipe and she looked all over for it, only to discover that it was in her mouth all the time." Doesn't sound too sophisticated!

First, I have not heard from Travis Griffin... nothing came in today's mail.

Received the following from an query I left on rootsweb - global search. I hope the info proves fruitful.

Linda

Been thinking of your research into Rebecca's life. Thought these remembrances might help you understand the kind of person she is remembered as being.

Info on Rebecca from the FTM - Linda's file:Tombstone 24 Aug 1859 - copied by me in June 1982 - cemetery records from Liberty Cemetery, Kendrick Richardson, Rt. 3, Box 540, 112 W. Atlanta Street, Greenwood, Arkansas 72936

"Retha Frisbie recalls going to visit Aunt Becky when she was a teenager. She was taken to Mena by her Dad for a revival meeting and asked if June Bryant could come along (Oscar & Mary's daughter). My Grandfather took both girls to Mena to stay with Aunt Becky during the time of the meeting. Retha recalls -"She was a tiny woman, but jolly and teasing all the time. She let June and me do just about anything we wanted to do. Aunt Becky had a real good looking male school teacher boarding with her at the time, so June decided she'd make him a real special dinner. Went out to the chicken coop, killed a chicken and the two of them spent all day preparing this fancy dinner. Unbeknownst to the school teacher, who called shortly before the dinner hour to let Aunt Becky know that he wouldn't be coming home for dinner that night. Retha recalls that Aunt Becky had the most fun teasing June about that for a long time."

Retha must have been about 14-16 so that would have been 1927-29!

MEMO FROM WAYNE MCDONALD:

I mentioned this story to Jane a few months back and she was going to think about it some. I will forward this to her for comments. The time frame you mentioned is interesting since William Oscar and family were either living in Webbers Falls, Oklahoma area or Antlers, Oklahoma at the time.

With regard to Martha Elizabeth. My Uncle Hewlos related to me that she had a cancer on her face that had eaten very deep. As far as I know all of William Oscar and Mary D. McDonald's children smoked except Waneva. Mary D. dipped snuff until she was 96 and quit because it got too messy. This was about 1 year before she died. I do not believe it was uncommon for women to smoke pipes and dip snuff during that time frame.

Thanks for the refresher on Retha and Junes trip to Aunt Becky's.

Each story I have been told about her relates a very jolly person! June's daughter Jane Bryant might offer some leads into the life of Aunt Becky from her mother's memories.

Also - Martha Elizabeth (her brother was suppose to be VERY wealthy) but this was told to by my aunt Retha Frisbie "Retha talks during Christmas of 1993 - she remembers her Dad, James Tillman McDonald, telling about how Martha smoked a pipe. "One time she thought she lost her pipe and she looked all over for it, only to discover that it was in her mouth all the time."

In the 1850 Census for Pike and Barbour Counties in Alabama, there are over 20 McDonald families listed. I am unable to find an Elijah enumerated with any of them. There was a very large Scottish immigrant enclave living in these two counties in the early 1800's. Bullock Co was created in 1866 from large portions of Pike and Barbour counties, and even today the communities of Scotland, Inverness, Aberfoil, Dairen, etc. still exist there. The Pea River Presbyterian Church on the Barbour / Pike Border dates back to 1830 and hundreds of Scots are buried there. Almost every name begins with Mc.......You might look in the 1850 Henry Co, AL census for Elijah, Henry adjoined this area, and also had a lot of Scotsmen there. Additionally, you might check the 1850 census of McIntosh and Irwin Counties in GA, since a lot of the Scots from GA, came from there...... Jack@worldnet.att.net>

To: Cynthia Forde <cynthia.forde@worldnet.att.net>

Sent: Tuesday, August 29, 2000 11:00 AM

Subject: Re: [ARSebast] SAM HOUSE

Greenwood School District No. 25 was for most all of the schools in south eastern Sebastian Co. It encompassed the Cornish, Jenny Lind, Rye Hill, New Hope, Burnville. Communities farther south and west were in another district of the Co. Since your information reference Greenwood, it can be assumed your ancestor lived in the Greenwood school attendance boundary.

The major elementary and only high school was in Greenwood proper. Children's of families in the outlying areas would have attend an elementary school nearby. Such schools varied in grades taught. New Hope was a one room school house for I think grades 1-3. Jenny Lind was 1-9, Cornish 1-6, Rye Hill 1-6. After completing the grade level of the elementary school the student were then bused to the Greenwood schools. The Greenwood Elementary school that existed by 1900 was housed in a sand stone quarried rock building originally built around 1882. The elementary school was housed in that building until the 1950's when a new school was built on the site of newly acquired acreage adjoining the high school. Now as to records. If they still exist they will be in the archives of the Greenwood District Superintendent of Schools. About the only thing the record would contain would be name and grades for each grading period. These would be the teacher daily roll book and record. I don't believe you would find any other information. Also the are some peculiar laws that prohibits release of school records except to the person they refer to. You may try and write and see what they can tell you. You know over the years there have been many fire that destroyed public records. The Superintendents office was house in the high school building. A new school had been built about 1928-30 era. That school building burnt, So, there could be that all school records of previous years were lost in the fire, I know when I was in high school there were no fire resistant file cabinets being use for records. Superintendent of Schools

District No. 25. Greenwood. AR 72936 After the new elementary school was built the old school property was sold to Means Wilkerson, President of the Farmers Bank of Greenwood. He completely renovated the building to be his residence. His widow still resides in it.

MEMORIES OF GRAMMA BECKY IN MONTGOMERY Co, AR - by Betty Miller Francis

I remember going to visit Gramma House (Rebecca) on vacation. It was before my mother (Ruby King) died; she died when I was eight years old. We took a train to Board Camp. Uncle Jim (Looney) picked us up at the train depot around 5:00 PM in a touring car. Open on both sides. The car had sides that would pull down to protect us from the rain. We drove way out into the country... into the woods... to their house. Her husband, Sam House, must have had dementia, although I did not realize it until I was an adult. She had to care for him like he was a child.

Gramma House had a good sense of humor. She told crazy ghost stories. One of the stories I remember clearly... "Back in the old days of horse and buggy, (people) were riding along when they heard the panthers howling... chasing them... they started going faster and faster and faster and faster... panther was gaining ground... so THEY THREW THE YOUNGEST BABY OUT TO THE PANTHER!" Aunt Betty says, "Scared the Hell out of me!!!! I remember we went out in the field then to hoe cotton... we heard a howl... dropped our hoes and ran to the house as fast as we could go. Now that I think about it... it was probably a wild cat and not a panther... "

Aunt Betty, "I also remember that the adults ate first. Then the children ate. That was just backward from our house... ! (Betty Francis was Rebecca Jarrett McDonald's Granddaughter.)

When I go up in the mountains... and smell pine, fresh air, I am reminded of Gramma House. That smell of pine brings back memories of my visits to her. Another thing the pine reminds me of is that she would chew a twig to make a tooth brush. She gave us twigs... had us chew on the ends to create a 'brush' and we brushed our teeth.

Gramma House also smoked a cigar sitting out on the house porch, I remember that as well.

Another important thing that stuck in my mind... everybody talked about going to the 'university'... and I suppose that to mean the University in Little Rock. Education was important.

Grandpa Miller (Wm. Anderson Miller) was Scotch-Irish. Everybody was Methodist Episcopal. Many of his brothers were ministers. He was a farmer, but of course, dead before we came along.

And I remember that we went to someone's house... I think Ruby Little's house. (Retha Looney's step-daughter) They had a stillborn baby. They could not afford to embalm the baby so it laid on a table by the window when people came for a 'wake.' That baby on the table affected me so much I can still see that baby."

My Aunt Betty Frances also corrected a couple of things I wrote to Linda Miller... She (Betty Miller Francis) was in the ROTC not the WACS... and my mother (Rose Miller Vold) actually had the 'staring up spells' before her mother (Ruby King Miller, Coy Miller's wife) died. [which would have been before 1932]. That was news to me... perhaps mother was in denial. At any rate, it was a family secret so we could not discuss it. Harmful things... family secrets!

Aunt Betty said, "Daddy (Coy Miller) worked for the railroad... and got 'bumped' by seniority when hard times came, so he started a miniature golf course. Your mother (Rose Miller Vold) was hit in the head with a golf club and was unconscious for a time. I remember mama (Ruby King Miller) taking her to Dallas to the doctor... and then the spells started. Mama (Ruby King Miller) told us not to talk about it. When we went to live with Aunt Retha, the people in Mena were so good to her (Rose Miller Vold). She would have spells when she walked down the street and the people would just lead her up out of the street and on to the sidewalk out of danger."

"Also remember after mama (Ruby King Miller) died that we would beg daddy (Coy Miller) to take us on the Inter Urban Train to Dallas. He would be reading the paper... lost in thought... and say "Uh Huh!" So we would race in and get dressed and he would not remember telling us that he would take us to Dallas. But it was a treat to go there. One time we got to see Cab Calloway at the Majestic Theatre.

I also remember going to see Aunt Doshia in Dallas. OH how I loved her. She was so good to us. She would make pallets on the floor for us to sleep on.

Rebecca had four children by William Johnston: Jimmie Johnston, who looks just like daddy (Coy Miller), Jennie, Doshia, and Tillman. Jimmie Johnston was at daddy's (Coy Miller) funeral.

Aunt Retha Looney married Uncle Jim Looney. He had been married before and had two daughters, Mildred Looney Dowden who had one daughter, and Ruby Little. I think Gertrude was Aunt Retha's daughter... but I am not certain about it. Anyway, Eloise and Helen were the two daughters by Jim Looney.

More About REBECCA JARRETT MCDONALD:

  • Baptism: September 1858, Methodist Church, Montgomery, AL
  • Religion: 1874, Methodist Church, Greenwood, AR

Children of WILLIAM MILLER and MARTHA FLEMING are:

i. JOSEPH A5 MILLER, b. March 24, 1866, Dallas, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde; Robert E Miller.); d. January 6, 1877 (Source: Cynthia Forde.).

ii. JAMES MONROE MILLER, b. 1868, Dallas, Polk Co, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde; Robert E Miller.); d. April 11, 1885 (Source: Cynthia Forde.).

Census Info:

1880 Arkansas, Polk Co. Fulton Twp, page 552D

20. iii. "ETTA" LENNESAI OR ETTA TENNESSEE MILLER, b. March 1869, Dallas, Arkansas; d. September 25, 1927, Hominy, Osage Co, Oklahoma.

iv. NANCY E MILLER, b. March 5, 1871, Cherry Hill, Mena, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.); d. August 8, 1875, Cherry Hill, Mena, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.).

  • More About NANCY E MILLER:  Burial: Cherry Hill, Mena, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.)

v. BETTY MILLER, b. Abt 1872 (Source: Cynthia Forde.).

21. vi. MAUDE MILLER, b. Abt 1874, Arkansas; d. March 12, 1937, Mena, Polk Co, Arkansas.

22. vii. ROLAND DOUGLAS MILLER, b. December 2, 1875, Board Camp, Arkansas; d. Nunley, Polk Co, Arkansas.

23. viii. ANNA (OR MARY) MAE MILLER, b. April 8, 1877, Dallas, Polk Co, Arkansas; d. June 1985, Tulsa, Tulsa Co, Oklahoma.

ix. LAURA C MILLER, b. February 13, 1878 (Source: Cynthia Forde.); d. October 11, 1879 (Source: Cynthia Forde.).

Census Info:

1880 Arkansas, Polk Co. Fulton Twp, page 552D

x. FRANK MILLER, b. Abt 1880, ? (Source: Cynthia Forde.).

xi. WILLIAM ABE MILLER, b. 1880 (Source: Cynthia Forde.).

Children of WILLIAM MILLER and REBECCA MCDONALD are:

24. xii. FANNIE LOU RETHA5 MILLER, b. March 31, 1888, Greenwood, Sebastian Co, Arkansas; d. 1980, Tucson, Arizona.

25. xiii. COY CLIFTON MILLER, b. June 3, 1892, Greenwood, Sebastian Co, Arkansas; d. May 12, 1962, Mena, Polk Co, Arkansas.

 

11. "LUM" CHRISTOPHER COLUMBUS4 MILLER (JOHN3, JAMES2, JOHN1) was born January 3, 1845 in Rising Fawn, Georgia (Source: Cynthia Forde; Robert E Miller.), and died April 12, 1891 in Board Camp, Montgomery Co, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.). He married MELINDA S. WILSON (Source: Cynthia Forde.). She was born 1852 in Mississippi (Source: Robert E Miller.).

Census Info:

1850 Georgia, Dade Co. District 21, household 169 line 8

In the 1880 Arkansas Polk Co. Mountain Twp page 564B census, there is Christopher C Miller age 32 Georgia, Elisa Miller age 30 Arkansas, Nancy Miller age 8 Arkansas, Laura B Miller age 1 Arkansas. I think this is this family but didn't input it because I wasn't sure of wife and last child. I think it is because he is listed with all his brothers and their families in the same area of this census.

  • Look in the Ark 1870 census, Polk Co, center twp, Dallas post office  (Source: Robert E Miller.)

Lum Miller was a farmer.

Information from Cynthia Forde:

Columbus C. Miller moved to Polk Co, Arkansas with his parents in 1859 at the age of 14. He married in Polk Co, around 1868, He was called, Lum. He died in Montgomery Co, AR on April 12, 1891. Leaves a wife and three children to mourn him. James J. 1869, Nancy b. 1870 and Glydas, b. 1871.. and probably died as an infant. Gaylord, born in 1888. they were not found in the 1870 Census.

Nancy married Will Lemons, and had one child who died as an infant. Gaylord lived with his sister., Nancy.

Columbus C."Lum" Miller 1/3/1845-4/12/1891

Melinda A."Sis"Wilson

James J. 7/1869 b

Nancy M.b9/1870 m William F.Lemons 10/09/1887

Dovie Laura B. b 1879 m Arlie B Williams 09/24/1899

Gailord b 05/ 1888

 

12 day of May 1910 ,Pushmataha Co. Ok.Kasoma TSW.

Miller ,Gaylord 20 head AR. GA.NC.

Williams,Dovie 31 sister widow 1child AR. GA. NC.

Gertrude 04niece AR. AR. AR

Children of "LUM" MILLER and MELINDA WILSON are:

i. JAMES J5 MILLER, b. July 2, 1870, Polk Co, Arkansas (Source: Robert E Miller.).

ii. "LUM" NANCY MINNIE MILLER, b. September 1869, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.); m. WILL LEMONS, Abt 1888 (Source: Cynthia Forde.); b. October 1864, Texas.

Census Info:

1900 Arkansas, Polk Co. Fulton Twp, household 128 line 27

Notes for WILL LEMONS:

Census Info:

1900 Arkansas, Polk Co. Fulton Twp, household 128 line 27

iii. GLYDAS MILLER, b. 1871 (Source: Cynthia Forde.).

iv. GAYLORD MILLER, b. May 1888, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.).

Census Info:

1900 Arkansas, Polk Co. Fulton Twp, household 128 line 27

 

12. HIRAM DOUGLAS4 MILLER (JOHN3, JAMES2, JOHN1) was born July 5, 1847 in Rising Fawn, Dade Co., Georgia (Source: Cynthia Forde; Robert E Miller.), and died 1901 in Board Camp, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.). He married MARTHA LOU ELLISON December 4, 1884 (Source: Cynthia Forde.). She was born April 18, 1870 in Guntersville, Alabama (Source: Cynthia Forde.), and died 1910 (Source: Cynthia Forde.).

Census Info:

1850 Georgia, Dade Co. District 21, household 169 line 8

1880 Arkansas, Polk Co. Fulton Twp, page 549B

1900 Arkansas, Polk Co. Fulton Twp, household 46 line 43

  • Look for 1870 Polk Co Arkansas Fulton Twp house 449

Notes for MARTHA LOU ELLISON:

Census Info:

1900 Arkansas, Polk Co. Fulton Twp, household 46 line 43

Children of HIRAM MILLER and MARTHA ELLISON are:

i. CLUSTIE MARTHA5 MILLER, b. July 23, 1887, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.); m. DALE CLEMENT (Source: Cynthia Forde.).

Census Info:

1900 Arkansas, Polk Co. Fulton Twp, household 46 line 43

ii. AGNES ELIZABETH MILLER, b. May 10, 1889, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.); m. "BILL" WILLIAM O'BANNON, November 21, 1907 (Source: Cynthia Forde.).

Census Info:

1900 Arkansas, Polk Co. Fulton Twp, household 46 line 43

iii. JOHN DOUGLAS MILLER, b. March 14, 1892, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.); d. August 1968, Cathage, Panola Co, Texas (Source: Social Security Death Index.); m. ONA HEATH (Source: Cynthia Forde.).

Census Info:

1900 Arkansas, Polk Co. Fulton Twp, household 46 line 43

Social Security issued in Louisiana (Source: Social Security Death Index.)

iv. ROY R MILLER, b. October 5, 1895, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.).

Census Info:

1900 Arkansas, Polk Co. Fulton Twp, household 46 line 43

v. CLIFTON QUILLAN MILLER, b. February 24, 1897, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.).

Census Info:

1900 Arkansas, Polk Co. Fulton Twp, household 46 line 43

vi. HETTIE LOU MILLER, b. March 14, 1899, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.).

Census Info:

1900 Arkansas, Polk Co. Fulton Twp, household 46 line 43

 

Generation No. 5

13. "NANNIE" NANCY ELIZABETH5 MILLER (JAMES MONROE4, JOHN3, JAMES2, JOHN1) was born November 7, 1855 in Social Hill, Hot Spring, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde; Robert E Miller.), and died March 12, 1913 in Eldorado, Union Co, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.). She married JOHN WESLEY VANTREASE November 7, 1872 in Social Hill, Hot Spring, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.), son of WILLIAM VANTREASE and TABITHA LOVELACE. He was born November 4, 1848 in Jackson, Madison Co, Tennesee (Source: Cynthia Forde.), and died January 29, 1926 in El Dorado, Union Co, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.).

  • More About "NANNIE" NANCY ELIZABETH MILLER:  Burial: Neighbors Cemetery (Source: Cynthia Forde.)

Census Info:

1880 Arkansas, Hot Spring Co. Prairie Bayou Twp, page 557C

From the records of Robert Earl Miller:

Nancy was baptized by S. Boise.

Nancy was eight years old, almost nine, when her mother died. Her Aunt Mary Miller and Grandfather James Monroe Miller raised the family until Nancy married. She then raised her brother Robert. Perhaps Nelson and Quillian also lived with her.

Notes for JOHN WESLEY VANTREASE:

Census Info:

1880 Arkansas, Hot Spring Co. Prairie Bayou Twp, page 557C

Information about John Vantrease given to Cynthia Forde by John Robert Vantrease Sr - Rount One Box 46, Malvern, Arkansas 72104.

Children of "NANNIE" MILLER and JOHN VANTREASE are:

i. "WILLIE" FANNIE WILLIE6 VANTREASE, b. August 3, 1873, Arkansas; d. May 1954; m. ELIHU FRANK WILSON, November 3, 1896.

Census Info:

1880 Arkansas, Hot Spring Co. Prairie Bayou Twp, page 557C

Notes for ELIHU FRANK WILSON:  Elihu Frank Wilson was a minister.

ii. "ETHEL" FLORA ETHEL VANTREASE, b. August 13, 1875, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.); d. August 23, 1948, Polk Co, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.); m. "DUKE" WALTER DUKE SEWELL; b. 1872; d. 1954.

Census Info:

1880 Arkansas, Hot Spring Co. Prairie Bayou Twp, page 557C

iii. LENA CLIDE VANTREASE, b. September 24, 1877, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.); d. July 24, 1880 (Source: Cynthia Forde.).

Census Info:

1880 Arkansas, Hot Spring Co. Prairie Bayou Twp, page 557C

iv. JAMES MARVIN VANTREASE, b. January 21, 1880, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.); d. October 7, 1881 (Source: Cynthia Forde.).

Census Info:

1880 Arkansas, Hot Spring Co. Prairie Bayou Twp, page 557C

Named Garfield in 1880 census - age 5 months

v. VERA ALICE VANTREASE, b. February 2, 1882 (Source: Cynthia Forde.); d. 1964; m. "DOSS" E DOSS CHIPMAN; b. 1878; d. 1957.

vi. VIRDA VIVIAN VANTREASE, b. September 8, 1884 (Source: Cynthia Forde.); d. 1957; m. JAMES BROOKS PARKER; b. 1874.

vii. AMY ALICE VANTREASE, b. March 7, 1887 (Source: Cynthia Forde.); d. October 3, 1889 (Source: Cynthia Forde.).

viii. JOHN HUNTER VANTREASE, b. May 31, 1889 (Source: Cynthia Forde.); d. 1907.

ix. WILLIE MILLER VANTREASE, b. December 21, 1891 (Source: Cynthia Forde.); d. February 19, 1892 (Source: Cynthia Forde.).

x. "FRED" JAMES FRED VANTREASE, b. October 20, 1893, North Carolina; d. October 1972, Charlotte, Mecklenburg, North Carolina (Source: SSN internet site.); m. AUDRA MEADE; b. January 29, 1894, Louisiana; d. January 1978, North Palm Beach, Palm Beach, Florida (Source: SSN internet site.).

xi. LOIS VANTREASE, b. May 28, 1898, Arkansas; d. March 24, 1977, Pine Bluff, Arkansas; m. FRANK CHARLES WRIGHT; b. 1891; d. 1931.

From the Arkansas Gazette: March 25, 1977

PINE BLUFF -- Mrs Lois Vantrease Wright, aged 78, of Pine Bluff, widow of Frank Charles Wright, died Thursday (March 24). She was a retired social worker for the Jefferson Co Welfare Office and a member of Lakeside United Methodist Church and the Wesleyan Guild. She is survived by a daughter, Miss Betty L Wright of Pine Bluff. Grave side Service will be at 11am Saturday at Woodlawn Cemetery at El Dorado by Ralph Robinson & Son Mortuary.

 

14. ROBERT MORGAN5 MILLER (JAMES MONROE4, JOHN3, JAMES2, JOHN1) was born March 14, 1863 in Dallas, Arkansas (Source: Robert E Miller.), and died June 30, 1937 in Helena, Montana (Source: Newspaper clipping). He married JOSEPHINE ORILLA EVANS March 27, 1901 in Lower Highwood, Montana, daughter of WILLIAM EVANS and "LIBBIE" WHEALY. She was born December 28, 1878 in Fort Benton, Choteau Co, Montana (Source: Robert E Miller.), and died March 29, 1963 in Culbertson, Montana (Source: Newspaper clipping; Death announcement from funeral).

  • More About ROBERT MORGAN MILLER:  Burial: July 1, 1937, Harmon Cemetery next to grandson Lorin Harmon -Bainville (Source: Cynthia Forde.)
  • More About JOSEPHINE ORILLA EVANS:    Burial: Bainville Cemetery, Bainville, Montana (Source: Robert E Miller.)

Census Info:

1880 Arkansas, Hot Spring Co. Prairie Bayou Twp, page 557C

1900 Montana, Cascade Co., Sand Coulee Twp, household 62 line 32

1920 Montana, Roosevelt Co. Bainville Twp, household 47 line 30

  • Look for 1910 Montana Valley Co School Dist 10 ... Evans line 53 Miller line 59 Crusch line 93

Reared by his sister Nancy.

From notes written by Robert Earl Miller:

Robert Morgan Miller was baptized Aug 1, 186? by Parson Waikly.

Robert Morgan Miller came to Circle, Montana about 1884 with a trail herd of cattle from Texas. When he got to Montana, 1883-4, he was a cowboy for many years. He worked on various ranches including the N--N (N Bar N) Ranch and the Circle outfit. About 1899 or 1900, he homesteaded in upper Sand Coulee, near Evans P.O. He also worked as a lumberjack around Helena, and on the railroad, (G.N.) night herding mules for several years from North Dakota to Great Falls.

After Bud had visited him and returned to Arkansas, he married Josephine Orilla Evans of Lower Highwood on March 27, 1901

In 1903 he traded his farm for cattle, and with his family, drove them to Culbertson, Montana.

He worked a year or so for J. S. Day, across the Missouri river from Culbertson, then he and his wife filed on "desert" claims on Red Bank creek 10 miles northeast of what is now Bainville, Montana.

The first winter most of the cattle died and he turned to farming with somewhat primitive equipment.

The rest of his life was a battle with drought and debt.

He died July 1, 1937 in Helena, Montana.

Information from Cynthia Forde:

Robert Morgan Miller was born 14 March 1863 in Dallas, Arkansas, the fourth and youngest child of his parents. His father, James Monroe Miller, a 3rd Lieutenant in Williamson's Arkansas Cavalry in the Confederate Army died in captivity at Johnson's Island near Sandusky, Ohio 1 October, 1864; his mother, Elizabeth Killian Miller died of pneumonia and tuberculosis 24 February 1865 just before Robert turned two, without knowing of the death of her husband.

His grandparents, John and Nancy Miller, and his aunt, Mary Jane, raised Robert until his sister Nancy married the Reverend John Wesley Vantrease in 1871. Nannie took him with her to her new home, and he lived with them until he was 15. At age 15, he went to Texas and worked there on a ranch.

At age 21 he came up the Chisholm Trail with the first herd of the O (Circle) Ranch cattle outfit to come to Montana. Some of the old ranch buildings, where the town of Circle now stands, and which he helped to build are still in use. He was later employed on the construction of the Great Northern Railroad through Montana, and then worked for a while in the woods near Helena.

About 1899 or 1900 he homesteaded in upper Sand Coulee, Montana near Evans Post Office. There, he met and married Josephine Evans of Lower Highwood March 17, 1901. In 1903, he traded his farm for cattle, and with his family, drove them to Culbertson. He worked for a year or so for J.S. Day, across the Missouri River from Culbertson, then he and his wife filed on 'desert claims on Red Bank Creek 10 miles northeast of what is now Bainville.

The first winter most of the cattle died and he turned to farming with somewhat primitive equipment. Later, he mostly raised horses. He resided on the ranch for 35 years, in a constant battle with drought and debt.

He died 1 July 1937, while visiting at the home of his son, Robert, in Helena, Montana

(written by his son, Robert E. Miller, father of Dinah Miller Tillotson)

OBITUARIES;

Robert Morgan Miller was born at Dallas, Arkansas, March 14, 1863. His father, a soldier in the confederate army, died a year later, and his mother died from hardships of the Civil War.

He came to Montana in 1884 with a trail herd from Texas and he engaged in ranching which occupation he followed nearly all his life except for a few years when he worked on construction work for the Great Northern Railway, and at lumbering near Helena. He was married to Josephine Evans of Highwood in 1901, and to this union were born three children, Robert, Nelson, and Gladys now Mrs. Wm. Harmon, these with 10 grandchildren survive.

They came to Bainville in 1902. and lived on a ranch at Red Banks Creek most of the time, and part of the time in town. He was esteemed by all who knew him, and he devoted much attention to the education of his children. Of an active disposition, he kept busy even with the advancing years and never considered himself retired. During the past month his health failed rapidly and just before the final crisis he went to Helena to the home of his son Robert for the medical attention where he passed away June 30, 1937, aged 75 years three months and 16 days. His passing comes as a distinct loss to his family and also to the larger circle of his friends and acquaintances by whom he was universally loved and respected. He was a regular attendant of the Methodist church and was deeply interested in Bible Study and the things of the spiritual life.

Funeral Services were held at the Harmon Home on Sunday afternoon, conducted by Rev. F. W. Age of the Methodist Church who spoke on the subject, "Light at Evening." A quartette composed of Mrs. Chas. Johnson, and others. At his personal request he was laid to rest in a private burial lot on the Harmon Ranch SE of town where he was laid to rest beside the body of his grandchild, Lauren Harmon who died of drowning three years to the day of his funeral.

BOB MILLER DIES IN HELENA AT HOME OF SON:

Mr. Miller was known and esteemed by a great many friends, not only in Roosevelt Co but in all parts of the state where he had resided during the last half century.

OBITUARIES;

Robert Morgan Miller was born at Dallas, Arkansas, March 14, 1863. His father, a soldier in the confederate army, died a year later, and his mother died from hardships of the Civil War.

He came to Montana in 1884 with a trail herd from Texas and he engaged in ranching which occupation he followed nearly all his life except for a few years when he worked on construction work for the Great Northern Railway, and at lumbering near Helena. He was married to Josephine Evans of Highwood in 1901, and to this union were born three children, Robert, Nelson, and Gladys now Mrs. Wm. Harmon, these with 10 grandchildren survive.

They came to Bainville in 1902. and lived on a ranch at Red Banks Creek most of the time, and part of the time in town. He was esteemed by all who knew him, and he devoted much attention to the education of his children. Of an active disposition, he kept busy even with the advancing years and never considered himself retired. During the past month his health failed rapidly and just before the final crisis he went to Helena to the home of his son Robert for the medical attention where he passed away June 30, 1937, aged 75 years three months and 16 days. His passing comes as a distinct loss to his family and also to the larger circle of his friends and acquaintances by whom he was universally loved and respected. He was a regular attendant of the Methodist church and was deeply interested in Bible Study and the things of the spiritual life.

Funeral Services were held at the Harmon Home on Sunday afternoon, conducted by Rev. F. W. Age of the Methodist Church who spoke on the subject, "Light at Evening." A quartette composed of Mrs. Chas. Johnson, and others. At his personal request he was laid to rest in a private burial lot on the Harmon Ranch SE of town where he was laid to rest beside the body of his grandchild, Lauren Harmon who died of drowning three years to the day of his funeral.

BOB MILLER DIES IN HELENA AT HOME OF SON:

Mr. Miller was known and esteemed by a great many friends, not only in Roosevelt Co but in all parts of the state where he had resided during the last half century.

 

1884, Moved to Montana from Texas

Occupation: farmer

Notes for JOSEPHINE ORILLA EVANS:

Census Info:

1880 Montana, Choteau Co. Fort Benton, household 262 line 38

Montana 1880 census says Josephine was born in Iowa

1900 Montana, Choteau Co. Fort Benton, household 450 line 39

1920 Montana, Roosevelt Co. Bainville Twp, household 47 line 30

  • Look for 1910 Montana Census Valley Co, Montana

Click here to see our Evans Family Genealogy

 

Children of ROBERT MILLER and JOSEPHINE EVANS are:

i. ROBERT EARL6 MILLER, b. March 22, 1902, Upper Sand Coulee, Cascade Co., Montana (Source: Certificate of Baptism; Robert E Miller.); d. December 8, 1985, Helena, Montana; m. ELVA MARIE SWEETLAND, August 16, 1925, Helena, Montana at the home of CE Sweetland (Source: Marriage Certificate; Wedding Announcement); b. November 17, 1904, Chitwood (Joplin), Missouri (Source: Life of William Albert Sweetland); d. March 5, 1989, Helena, Montana.

Census Info:

1920 Montana, Roosevelt Co. Bainville Twp, household 47 line 30

1930 Montana, Lewis & Clark Co. School District 1 Helena City, household 68 line 1

Many of my (Kathy Miller Bolam) relatives went to Intermountain Union College together: Margaret Tullock (step-Grandma), Atha Stellmon (Grandma), Clarice Stellmon (Great Aunt), Glem Stellmon (Great Uncle), Robert E Miller (Grandpa), Elva Sweetland (Grandma), Vera Sweetland (Great Aunt), and Edith Sweetland (Great Aunt). There may have been others but I don't know of them. Elva, Vera, and Edith's father, my Great Grandfather, was a janitor at the college. Leon Sweetland was the President of the college.

Robert Earl Miller was baptized June 1, 1905 in Culbertson, Montana. He graduated from Culbertson High School May 20, 1920 and from Intermountain Union College on June 3, 1925. He became editor of The Livingston Enterprise in 1940 and of the Helena Independent Record in 1960. He went on to work in the Montana Press Association where he retired for the 2nd time Aug 16, 1974.

----

Biographical: Written October 3, 1973 by Robert E Miller

Born March 22, 1902, near Evans, P.O. in Cascade Co. Reared in eastern Montana in what is now Roosevelt Co. Attended rural school, then Bainville high school for 3 years; graduated from Culbertson high school in 1920. Taught rural grade school for one year. Then attended Montana Wesleyan College in Helena. After two years name of college was changed to Intermountain Union College. Took part in intercollegiate debate. Graduated with honors in 1925. Taught school at Joliet (Montana) high school for one year. Then got a job as reporter for the Montana Record Herald in Helena. (Had been college news reporter for this paper.) It had been owned by Dr. O.M. Lanstrum, but he sold it to the Anaconda Copper Mining Co. probably early in 1926 and that made it prosperous enough to hire another reporter. Covered local news, plus several sessions of state legislature, including impeachment of secretary of state. One memory is of a printers' strike during which editorial staff was on half pay all summer. Another is of earthquakes in 1935. At that time I was managing editor, at least with the duties if not the title. Continued that job for five more years, handling telegraph wire, directing reporters, making up pages, until 1940 when I was transferred to Livingston to be editor of the Enterprise, succeeding LeClaire Flint. Continued as editor of the Enterprise, uneventfully, for nearly 20 years, having charge only of news, with no duties in business office. Member of Rotary Club in Livingston. Elected District Governor of Rotary in 1952, the district comprising Montana. Lee Enterprises bought the paper, plus others owned by Anaconda, in 1959, and soon thereafter I was transferred to Helena to be editor of Helena Independent Record, succeeding E.A. (Shorty) Dye upon his death. Remained in that position until April 1, 1967, when, upon attaining the age of 65, I was retired. Since then I have been secretary-manager of the Montana Press Association. Member of the Masonic fraternity and have attained the 33rd degree in Scottish Rite, which is an honorary status denoting special service to the order. Author of three books, "The Hands of the Workmen," which is a history of the Masonic order in Montana; "Ninety Years of Scottish Rite in Montana," a history of that order; and, most recent and not yet published, "Montana's Greatest Charity," a history of the Montana Children's Home and Hospital Society. In 1925 married Elva Marie Sweetland, a classmate at Intermountain Union College. Three children, Gladys, now Mrs. Ben Tillotson, Bellevue, Wash.; Robert M., now with Boeing in Seattle; and Patricia, now Mrs. B.B. Gailey, Mt. Home, Idaho. In addition, we reared an orphan niece, Dorothy Garrard, now Mrs. Dave Dougherty, Ennis, Mt. Fifteen grandchildren in the four families.

_______________

Recollections of the Anaconda Years by Robert E Miller

My employment by newspapers owned by the Anaconda Copper Mining Company, later the Anaconda Company, began in 1926 and continued until 1959 when the Anaconda papers were purchased by Lee Newspapers.

My memory of those years is not too sharp, and so I have gone over a couple of articles reprinted in "The Montana Past," an anthology edited by Michael P. Malone and Richard Roeder of Montana State University.

One of the articles, "Togetherness: A Look into Montana Journalism," by Richard T Ruetten, contains the statement that it was not possible until 1951 to document Anaconda's domination of the newspapers which it owned.

This is not in accord with my memory. As I remember it, it was common knowledge that Anaconda owned the Montana Standard in Butte, the Butte Daily Post, the Anaconda Standard, the Billings Gazette, the Missoulian, the Missoula Sentinel, the Livingston Enterprise, the Helena Independent, and the Montana Record-Herald in Helena, plus perhaps a weekly paper or two.

The Anaconda and Butte papers probably had been owned since the earlier mining days. The Helena Independent was owned before some of the others. It was in the early and mid-1920's that most of the papers were acquired, I believe. I know that it was about 1926 that Dr. O.M. Lanstrum, a Helena physician who had owned the Montana Record-Herald for several years, sold it to Anaconda.

I had been the paper's reporter at Intermountain Union College, 1923-25, and when I returned to Helena after a year of teaching at Joliet High School, I was offered a job as a reporter. There had been only one city reporter before that time, plus one Capitol reporter. Editor George A Roberts told me that since the Anaconda Company was now the owner they could afford two reporters.

It is my recollection that prior to the purchase of the Record-Herald, that paper had carried on a keen rivalry with the Helena Independent, but that this was toned down considerably after the ownership was merged.

C.H. Reifenrath was listed as president and manager of the Record Publishing Co. and he continued in that position for some time after the ownership changed. Eventually he was succeeded by Addison K Lusk, who as I recall, was a former resident of Polson or Kalispell.

Ruetten says in his article cited above: "Sometime in the early 1930s a change of policy occurred in company journalism, a change quite apparent by 1934. Company papers, with the possible exceptions of the Helena Record-Herald and the Helena Independent, showed less concern with state elections and used less poison on editorial pages....The vulgar commentary of company editors was slowly replaced by innocuous platitudes from anonymous figureheads....With their heavy artillery spiked, Anaconda papers became monuments of indifference. Henceforth, the company's position on Montana politics would not be openly displayed on editorial pages...."

Another article in the same book, "The Montana Past," was written by Thomas Payne. It is titled, "Montana: Politics Under the Copper Dome." Payne reaches the same conclusion as Ruetten, or at least he repeats Ruetten's conclusion: "Beginning with the 1930s, however, the Anaconda-owned papers underwent a marked change in their treatment of political news. Controversial news was often suppressed entirely, when it was not buried on an inside page."

My personal recollections are that both writers are correct. Before the 1930s I was in the position of a lowly reporter of local news and I did not know what orders my superiors operated under.

After I became a desk man about 1935 upon the retirement of George A Roberts, the editor was Lynn Young and he took care of newspaper policy.

Once, however, I ventured close to the point of knuckle-rapping. Lynn Young was on vacation and I was designated to write the editorials during his absence. It was about 1939, I believe, or early in 1940. The gold dredge was digging up the land at the lower end of Last Chance Gulch, just north of the Helena city limits, leaving huge piles of gravel. (These are still visible 33 years later.) I wrote a vigorous editorial pointing to the results and asking: Is a Gold Dredge an Asset to the Community?

When Mr. Young returned from his vacation he was called to visit headquarters in Butte and when he came back he told me that the rule was that no company paper ever questioned any aspect of the mining industry.

Not too long after that I was transferred to Livingston to be editor of the Enterprise and I have often wondered whether the transfer was a promotion or a demotion.

In Livingston I was not so close to company politics or policies. I knew enough about is so that I did not violate the rules. Every morning my first task was to read the Montana Standard very thoroughly and determine how any controversial matter had been handled. Thus I was able to follow company instructions without any day-to-day instructions.

Things went on in this manner for nearly 20 years.

I cannot recall any particular incidents connected with implementation of company policy through the editorial columns of the Enterprise.

But it must have been a pretty dull paper, as the following incident indicates.

Every morning at 10 o'clock it was my habit to go out for coffee with a group of Livingston businessmen who met at a drug store. Once, a few months after the Lee people had bought the paper, the fellows began to question me about the changes in the newspaper.

"What has happened to the Enterprise?" they asked.

"Nothing has happened to the Enterprise," was my answer, "except that Miller has been untied. He has been liberated."

That illustrated to me, more than anything else, the kind of a paper I had been running during the Anaconda years.

_________________

Helena AP 1960 - Appointment of Robert E Miller of Livingston as editor of the Helena Independent Record was announced Wednesday. Miller succeeds the late E.A. "Shorty" Dye.

The appointment was announced by Richard E Morrison, general manager of the Lee Newspapers of Montana.

Miller has been editor of The Livingston Enterprise for the past 20 years.

In Helena, he will be returning to the paper where he was trained in the newspaper business. He started work on the old Montana Record-Herald in 1926 and was news editor of that paper in 1940 when he went to Livingston.

He expects to assume his duties in Helena before Jan. 1.

Miller is a native of Montana, is a graduate of Culbertson High School, and of Intermountain Union College of Helena, Now Rocky Mountain at Billings.

Mrs. Miller is the former Elva Sweetland of Helena. They have three grown children, all married. Miller is a member of the Livingston Rotary Club and served as district governor of Rotary in Montana in 1952.

_______________

I have several more newspaper clippings that talk about Grandpa's newspaper career which I will not include here at this time. Kathy Miller Bolam

More About ROBERT EARL MILLER:

  • Baptism: June 1, 1905, Culbertson, Montana (Source: Certificate of Baptism)
  • June 3, 1925, Graduated from Intermountain Union College in Helena, Montana (Source: College Degree: Bachelor of Arts)
  • May 20, 1920, Culbertson High School graduation (Source: Robert E Miller.)

Notes for ELVA MARIE SWEETLAND:

Census Info:

1920 Montana, Lewis & Clark Co. Helena, household 100 line 9

1930 Montana, Lewis & Clark Co. School District 1 Helena City, household 68 line 1

Click here to see our Sweetland Family Genealogy

ii. GLADYS MYRTLE MILLER, b. June 11, 1904, Culbertson, Roosevelt Co, Montana (Source: Robert E Miller.); d. July 6, 1994, Williston, Williams Co, North Dakota; m. "BILL" WILLIAM EMORY HARMON, September 25, 1926, Bainville, Montana (Source: Robert E Miller.); b. July 10, 1902, Pulaski Co, Kentucky (Source: Robert E Miller.); d. August 12, 1995, Bethel Lutheran Home in Williston, North Dakota.

Census Info:

1920 Montana, Roosevelt Co. Bainville Twp, household 47 line 30

1930 Montana, Roosevelt Co. School District 12, household 4 line 12

From "The Billings Gazette" Obituaries:

Gladys Miller Harmon died in Bethel Lutheran Home at age 90 in Williston, North Dakota.

Gladys grew up on a ranch on Red Banks Creek about 10 miles northeast of Bainville. She attended local rural grade school and both Cut Bank High School and Bainville High School, graduating from Bainville in 1923. After attending a college summer session, she taught a year at the Harvey Grade School, north of Bainville. She then attended Intermountain college in Helena for two years.

She married William "Bill" Harmon of Bainville on Sept 25, 1926. They lived on his farm south of Bainville until entering a nursing home in 1991.

Gladys had 11 children, one of whom predeceased her (a son Lauren William, who drowned July 4, 1933 at the age of 4). She was also predeceased by her parents; her stepfather, Archie Brown; two brothers, Robert E Miller of Helena and Nelson R Miller of Missoula; one granddaughter; and one great grandson.

Survivors include her husband, Bill; seven daughters, Edith Benson of Schell City, Mo; Emma Jo Krause of Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; Virda Klindworth of Harlem, Agatha Rohde of Glasgow, Rita Booth of Mission, Texas, Janice Knudsen of Bainville, and Myra Goodwin of Vienna, Virginia.; three sons, Nolan Harmon of Great Falls, David Harmon and Carter Harmon of Bainville; 42 grandchildren and 56 great grandchildren. Also surviving are nieces, nephews and numerous cousins.

Notes for "BILL" WILLIAM EMORY HARMON:

Census Info:

1930 Montana, Roosevelt Co. School District 12, household 4 line 12

Newspaper article:  HARMON GRANDCHILDREN HOLD "COUSIN REUNION"

Bill and Gladys Harmon's grandchildren had their first cousin reunion at Larry and Colleen (Agatha's) Pankratz's farm Aug 8-10, 1980.

The reunion was organized to help to continue the close family ties the brothers and sisters have maintained. It was enjoyed so much, that all agreed it should be done again.

Opheim Montana was invaded by Glenn and Nola Rohde (Agatha's) Bozeman, MT; Al and Kristi Rohde (Agatha's) Glasgow, MT; Echo Rohde (Agatha's) and her fiance Ray Beery, Buren Germany; Laurel Benson (Edith's) Troy, Ohio; Leigh Benson (Edith's) Branson, Missouri; Diana and Ronnie Edwards and Joshua (Edith's) Harrison, AK; Reed Benson (Edith's) Omaha, AK; Rick and Renee Thorness (Janice's) and Gabriel, Miles and Rhonda Knudsen (Janice's), Neil and Gwen Knudsen (Janice's), Russ Harmon (David's), Michelle, Jill, and Heidi Harmon (Carter's) all of Bainville; Duane Klindworth (Virda's) Hogeland, MT; Daryl Klindworth (Virda's) Bozeman, MT; Kathy Klindworth (Virda's) Harlem, MT; Robbin and Dan Sweeney (Nolan's) Aberdeen, SD; Stacy and Holly Harmon (Nolan's) Ellendale, ND; Charles and Kristi Harmon (Nolan's) Buffalo, MN; Julie and Melea Krause (Emma Jo's) Harrison, AK. Only the Goodwins (Myrna) and the Booths (Rita) had no children present.

Guests on Sunday were grandparents Bill and Gladys Harmon and Dick and Agatha Rohde. There were 27 cousins, 7 spouses, and 5 great grandchildren making a grand total of 39!

iii. NELSON RAYMOND MILLER, b. February 28, 1906, near Culbertson,Montana (Source: Robert E Miller.); d. May 13, 1994, Missoula, Missoula Co, Montana (Source: rootsweb); m. GLADYS GEORGINA MAY FISH, January 17, 1944, England (Source: Robert E Miller.).

Census Info:

1920 Montana, Roosevelt Co. Bainville Twp, household 47 line 30

 

15. MARY JANE5 MILLER (JOSEPH WILSON4, JOHN3, JAMES2, JOHN1) was born October 1, 1853 in Rising Fawn, Dade Co, Georgia (Source: Cynthia Forde; Robert E Miller.), and died March 22, 1873 (Source: Cynthia Forde.). She married JOHN WESLEY VANTREASE February 10, 1870 (Source: Robert E Miller.), son of WILLIAM VANTREASE and TABITHA LOVELACE. He was born November 4, 1848 in Jackson, Madison Co, Tennesee (Source: Cynthia Forde.), and died January 29, 1926 in El Dorado, Union Co, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.).

Notes for JOHN WESLEY VANTREASE:

Census Info:

1880 Arkansas, Hot Spring Co. Prairie Bayou Twp, page 557C

Information about John Vantrease given to Cynthia Forde by John Robert Vantrease Sr - Rount One Box 46, Malvern, Arkansas 72104.

Marriage Notes for MARY MILLER and JOHN VANTREASE:  Mary and John had three children who all died in infancy. Mary died 12 days after the birth of her daughter Maratha. Martha also died about age 2 months.

Child of MARY MILLER and JOHN VANTREASE is:

i. MARTHA M6 VANTREASE, b. March 10, 1873 (Source: Robert E Miller.); d. Abt May 1873 (Source: Robert E Miller.).

 

16. NANCY LOUISE5 TATUM ("BETTY" ELIZABETH ANN4 MILLER, JOHN3, JAMES2, JOHN1) was born April 10, 1850 in Dade Co, Georgia (Source: Cynthia Forde.), and died December 20, 1918 in Board Camp, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.). She married ISAAC C LEWIS November 12, 1871 in Dade Co, Georgia (Source: Cynthia Forde.). He was born September 1845 in Spartanburg Co, South Carolina (Source: Cynthia Forde.), and died April 29, 1906 in Board Camp, Polk Co, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.).

Census Info:

1880 Arkansas, Polk Co. Fulton Twp, page 549B

1900 Arkansas, Polk Co. Fulton Twp, household 125 line 14

Notes for ISAAC C LEWIS:

Census Info:

1880 Arkansas, Polk Co. Fulton Twp, page 549B

1900 Arkansas, Polk Co. Fulton Twp, household 125 line 14

Children of NANCY TATUM and ISAAC LEWIS are:

i. GEORGE6 LEWIS, b. December 26, 1873, Dade Co, Georgia (Source: Cynthia Forde.); d. April 28, 1898, Board Camp, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.); m. SARAH ANN LOONEY, Bef. 1898 (Source: Cynthia Forde.); b. February 1878, Arkansas; d. August 29, 1963, Mena, Arkansas.

Census Info:

1880 Arkansas, Polk Co. Fulton Twp, page 549B

Notes for SARAH ANN LOONEY:

Census Info:

1900 Arkansas, Polk Co. Fulton Twp, household 126 line 19

ii. MARION JAMES LEWIS, SR., b. January 18, 1875, Dade Co, Georgia (Source: Cynthia Forde.); d. October 10, 1954, Opal, Montgomery Co, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.); m. MAUDE UPHEMA DEMING, July 25, 1896, Big Fork, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.); b. July 28, 1873, Erie, Pennsylvania (Source: Cynthia Forde.); d. May 28, 1965, Sulphur Springs, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.).

Census Info:

1880 Arkansas, Polk Co. Fulton Twp, page 549B

iii. EDWARD D LEWIS, b. February 23, 1877, Board Camp, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.); d. January 9, 1958 (Source: Cynthia Forde.); m. SARAH ANN LOONEY, March 4, 1900; b. February 1878, Arkansas; d. August 29, 1963, Mena, Arkansas.

Census Info:

1880 Arkansas, Polk Co. Fulton Twp, page 549B

1900 Arkansas, Polk Co. Fulton Twp, household 126 line 19

Notes for SARAH ANN LOONEY:

Census Info:

1900 Arkansas, Polk Co. Fulton Twp, household 126 line 19

iv. JO ANNA LEWIS, b. June 23, 1879, Board Camp, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.); d. May 1, 1951 (Source: Cynthia Forde.); m. JOHN GOBBLE, January 6, 1900, Polk Co, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.); b. 1843, Kentucky (Source: Cynthia Forde.).

Census Info:

1880 Arkansas, Polk Co. Fulton Twp, page 549B

v. ELZIE JACKSON LEWIS, b. December 2, 1881, Board Camp, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.); d. April 14, 1945, Opal, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.); m. FRANCIS ELIZABETH LAMBERT, May 4, 1902, Board Camp, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.); b. October 7, 1878, Clark Co, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.); d. May 21, 1953, Opal, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.).

vi. MAGGIE M LEWIS, b. April 5, 1884, Board Camp, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.); d. August 15, 1960 (Source: Cynthia Forde.); m. AARON VAN HEATH, April 16, 1903, Polk Co, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.); b. 1869, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.).

Census Info:

1900 Arkansas, Polk Co. Fulton Twp, household 125 line 14

vii. BETTY ELMYRA LEWIS, b. September 15, 1887, Board Camp, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.); d. October 18, 1928, Polk Co, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.); m. WILLIAM M FOSTER, November 16, 1913, Polk Co, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.); b. December 16, 1873 (Source: Cynthia Forde.); d. June 13, 1949, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.).

  • More About BETTY ELMYRA LEWIS:  Burial: Lower Big Fork Cemetery, Polk Co, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.)

Census Info:

1900 Arkansas, Polk Co. Fulton Twp, household 125 line 14

viii. MARY IDA LEWIS, b. March 23, 1890, Board Camp, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.); d. August 24, 1960, Polk Co, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.); m. (1) "COLUMBUS" F COLUMBUS HASS, May 3, 1909, Polk Co, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.); b. 1886, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.); m. (2) J.F. WHITE, January 14, 1917, Polk Co, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.).

Census Info:

1900 Arkansas, Polk Co. Fulton Twp, household 125 line 14

 

17. GEORGIANN DIERA5 STAFFORD (MARY JANE4 MILLER, JOHN3, JAMES2, JOHN1) was born September 18, 1877 in Board Camp, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.), and died December 20, 1913 in Board Camp, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.). She married JAMES MARION LOONEY November 21, 1901 in Mena, Polk Co, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.). He was born June 10, 1880 in Cherokee Nation, Indian Territory, Oklahoma (Source: Cynthia Forde.), and died September 15, 1935 in Fort Smith, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.).

  • More About JAMES MARION LOONEY:  Burial: Board Camp, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.)

Census Info:

1880 Arkansas, Polk Co. Fulton Twp, page 549B

Information from Cynthia Forde:

Georgiann was the daughter of William Miller's sister, Mary Jane Miller. When Georgianne died, Judge James Looney married William Miller;s daughter, Frances Lou Retha Miller. The name Frances is the name on the marriage application to Judge James Looney.

Children of GEORGIANN STAFFORD and JAMES LOONEY are:

i. RUBY LEE6 LOONEY, b. October 13, 1904, Board Camp, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.); d. August 3, 1989, Mena, Polk Co, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde; Social Security Death Index.); m. "JODY" JOSEPH D LITTLE, 1925 (Source: Cynthia Forde.); b. February 6, 1906 (Source: Cynthia Forde.); d. February 24, 1984 (Source: Cynthia Forde.).

ii. MILDRED LOONEY, b. November 10, 1913, Board Camp, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.); d. August 31, 1994, Roseburg, Oregon (Source: Cynthia Forde.); m. (1) JAMES DOWDEN (Source: Cynthia Forde.); m. (2) HARTZEL GEYER, 1934 (Source: Cynthia Forde.).

iii. LAYMON LOONEY (Source: Cynthia Forde.).

 

18. CANZADA JANE5 MILLER (JOHN THORNTON4, JOHN3, JAMES2, JOHN1) was born November 2, 1862 (Source: Cynthia Forde.), and died September 18, 1903 in Shreveport, Louisiana or Detroit, Red River, Texas (Source: Cynthia Forde.). She married JOHN G ELLISON (Source: Cynthia Forde.). He was born 1854 in Floyd Co, Georgia (Source: Cynthia Forde.).

Children of CANZADA MILLER and JOHN ELLISON are:

i. ALLIE EUGENE6 ELLISON, b. October 15, 1881 (Source: Cynthia Forde; Social Security Death Index.); d. November 12, 1966, Quitman, Wood Co, Texas (Source: Cynthia Forde; Social Security Death Index.); m. GEORGE WESLEY EPPS, 1903 (Source: Cynthia Forde.); b. , Indian Territory, Oklahoma (Source: Cynthia Forde.).

ii. ODIE THORNTON ELLISON, b. December 19, 1882, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.); m. ETTA KEETH (Source: Cynthia Forde.); b. March 20, 1891 (Source: Cynthia Forde.); d. May 1974, Red River, Clarksville Co, Texas (Source: Cynthia Forde; Social Security Death Index.).

iii. "FRED" ALFRED JONES ELLISON, b. August 1889, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.); m. VERGIE HARRISON (Source: Cynthia Forde.); b. April 1893 (Source: Cynthia Forde.); d. May 1981, Asheboro, Randolph Co, North Carolina (Source: Cynthia Forde.).

 

19. JOSEPH JONES5 MILLER (JOHN THORNTON4, JOHN3, JAMES2, JOHN1) was born July 31, 1888 in Rural Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.), and died 1970 (Source: Cynthia Forde.). He married GERALDINE BUSBY (Source: Cynthia Forde.).

Information from Cynthia Forde:  Written by Joseph Jones Miller:

I can't go back very far into our family. James (John) was born in S. C. near Charleston on Christmas day, 1803. He married Mary Wilson whose state of birth I do not know. They moved to Dade Co, GA near Trenton. Their children: Mary, Geo. Joe, James, Columbus, John Thornton and William.

John T. Miller, born Trenton, GA. Oct. 14, 1839 married Sarah Russell, born N.E AL in 1840. They were married in AL on Jan 2 1860. Their children:

  • Canzada Jane, born Nov. 2, 1862
  • Martha Josephine, May 6, 1865
  • George Gibson born May 19, 1868
  • Wallace Gladwin b. Dec. 12, 1870
  • Vernon b. August 4, 1873
  • They moved from AL or Ga to Charleston, AR.
  • Sarah Russell Miller died in Charleston in 1875.
  • Canzada died in Shreveport, La
  • Josephine died in Eastland Co, Nesdemoya (?) or Desdemoya, TX. (no date)
  • Gip died at Spur Texas in 1941
  • Wallace died at Pueblo, CO in 1945
  • Vernon died at Pasadena, TX in 1954

Sarah Russell Miller died Charleston, AR in 1875.

John T. Miller married Joan Cotton Lackey at Eggar (?) Dec. 7, 1876

Their children

  • Marvin Munsey b. March 4, 1878 d. April 12, 189?
  • John Cotton b. Jan 31, 1883, d. Feb. 1923
  • Edwin b. Aug 22, 1885 d. Aug 23, 1885
  • Joseph Jones b. July 31, 1888
  • Robert Franklin b. Jan 12, 1892

Joan Cotton (my mother ) was born of John Cotton and Sarah ? cotton at Senatobia, Miss. Oct. 7, 1852. She died at Idabel, OK in 1927. She had two sisters and two or three brothers, One daughter was the mother of Jo Huddestod wood of Mena, AR who died near Board Camp. Uncle Geo Cotton died at Sallisaw, Ok. Uncle Bill Cotton died at Board Camp AR Uncle Tom died at Board Camp. Prior to her marriage to John T. , my mother, Joan Cotton was married to Richard Lackey who died near Eggar, AR. They had one son , WM. Richard who lived and died at Opal, AR.

More About JOSEPH JONES MILLER:  Degree: Ouichita College/U. of Chicage (Source: (1) Dave Rambo, The Descendants of Peter Gunnarson Rambo, GEDCOM download., (2) MillerWorksSept.FTW.)

 

20. "ETTA" LENNESAI OR ETTA TENNESSEE5 MILLER (WILLIAM ANDERSON4, JOHN3, JAMES2, JOHN1) was born March 1869 in Dallas, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde; Robert E Miller.), and died September 25, 1927 in Hominy, Osage Co, Oklahoma (Source: Cynthia Forde.). She married DANIEL FRANCIS WILCOX April 29, 1894 in Mena, Polk Co, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.). He was born March 7, 1864 in Mercer Co, Missouri (Source: Cynthia Forde.), and died 1943 in Englewood, Clark Co, Kansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.).

Census Info:

1880 Arkansas, Polk Co. Fulton Twp, page 552D

1900 Arkansas, Polk Co. Fulton Twp, household 41 line 14

Notes for DANIEL FRANCIS WILCOX:

Census Info:

1900 Arkansas, Polk Co. Fulton Twp, household 41 line 14

Children of "ETTA" MILLER and DANIEL WILCOX are:

i. ARTIE LEOTA6 WILCOX, b. May 12, 1895 (Source: Cynthia Forde.); d. October 25, 1895 (Source: Cynthia Forde.).

ii. FRANKIE ELANOR WILCOX, b. December 5, 1896, Mena, Polk Co, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.); d. June 22, 1899, Mena, Polk Co, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.).

iii. WILLIAM DEWEY WILCOX, b. May 31, 1897, Mena, Polk Co, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.); d. June 24, 1899, Mena, Polk Co, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.).

iv. "GRETCHEN" EFFIE GRETCHEN WILCOX, b. January 1900, Mena, Polk Co, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.); d. June 25, 1918, Mena, Polk Co, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.).

Census Info:

1900 Arkansas, Polk Co. Fulton Twp, household 41 line 14

v. AMY ESTER WILCOX, b. February 28, 1902, Mena, Polk Co, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.); d. 1948, Englewood, Clark Co, Kansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.); m. BERT REYNOR (Source: Cynthia Forde.).

vi. JOSEPH ARVILLE WILCOX, b. November 13, 1908, Mena, Polk Co, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.); d. January 6, 1970, Garden City, Finney Co, Kansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.); m. (1) DOLORES ANADELL YOUNGERS (Source: Cynthia Forde.); b. November 23, 1911 (Source: Social Security Death Index.); d. July 20, 1998, Garden City, Finney Co, Kansas (Source: Social Security Death Index.); m. (2) GRACE LUCILLE KLOTZ, October 27, 1935, Meade, Meade Co, Kansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.); b. August 24, 1917, Meade Co, Kansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.); d. December 11, 1949, Ashland, Clark Co, Kansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.).

  • Occupation: Santa Fe Railway / School Custodian (Source: Cynthia Forde.)

vii. ARTHER HUBERT WILCOX (Source: Cynthia Forde.).

 

21. MAUDE5 MILLER (WILLIAM ANDERSON4, JOHN3, JAMES2, JOHN1) was born Abt 1874 in Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.), and died March 12, 1937 in Mena, Polk Co, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.). She married SHADRICK WILLIAM HILTON December 31, 1891 in Board Camp, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.). He was born May 29, 1871 in Board Camp, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.), and died April 13, 1952 in Mena, Polk Co, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.).

Census Info:

1880 Arkansas, Polk Co. Fulton Twp, page 552D

Children of MAUDE MILLER and SHADRICK HILTON are:

i. EVERETT MELVIN6 HILTON, b. December 12, 1892, Nunley, Polk Co, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.); d. February 1, 1964, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.); m. MATTIE EDWARDS, March 1916 (Source: Cynthia Forde.).

ii. FANNIE EDITH HILTON, b. August 8, 1894, Nunley, Polk Co, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.); d. April 16, 1956 (Source: Cynthia Forde.); m. RAYMOND CECIL ISOM, November 14, 1915 (Source: Cynthia Forde.).

iii. RETTA HILTON, b. October 11, 1895, Nunley, Polk Co, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.); d. September 3, 1962 (Source: Cynthia Forde.); m. WILLIAM LITTLE ABERNATHY, November 15, 1915 (Source: Cynthia Forde.).

iv. MARVIN HILTON, b. November 12, 1898, Nunley, Polk Co, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.); d. November 1983, Hot Springs National Park, Garland Co, Arkansas (Source: Social Security Death Index.); m. BLANCE BURROUGHS (Source: Cynthia Forde.); b. January 1, 1902 (Source: Social Security Death Index.); d. June 1982, Hot Springs National Park, Garland Co, Arkansas (Source: Social Security Death Index.).

v. "EMMETT" ROBERT EMMETT HILTON, b. April 12, 1904, Nunley, Polk Co, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.); d. August 22, 1968, Tulsa, Tulsa Co, Oklahoma (Source: Cynthia Forde.); m. "GENEVA" GURTHA GENEVA WARREN, December 28, 1926, Tulsa, Tulsa Co, Oklahoma (Source: Cynthia Forde.); b. November 8, 1905, California (Source: Cynthia Forde.); d. April 6, 1991 (Source: SSN database.).

vi. LAURA GLADYS HILTON, b. October 26, 1909, Nunley, Polk Co, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.); d. September 1989, Mena, Polk Co, Arkansas (Source: SSN database.); m. JOHN FRANKLIN DESHAZO, May 17, 1930 (Source: Cynthia Forde.); b. July 29, 1907, Arkansas (Source: SSN database.); d. November 1981, Mena, Polk Co, Arkansas (Source: SSN database.).

 

22. ROLAND DOUGLAS5 MILLER (WILLIAM ANDERSON4, JOHN3, JAMES2, JOHN1) was born December 2, 1875 in Board Camp, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.), and died in Nunley, Polk Co, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.). He married MAY ATRICE SPEARS (Source: Cynthia Forde.). She was born May 29, 1883 in Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.).

  • More About ROLAND DOUGLAS MILLER:  Burial: Board Camp, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.)

Census Info:

1880 Arkansas, Polk Co. Fulton Twp, page 552D

1900 Arkansas, Polk Co. Fulton Twp, household 134 line 64

Notes for MAY ATRICE SPEARS:

Census Info:

1900 Arkansas, Polk Co. Fulton Twp, household 134 line 64

 

23. ANNA (OR MARY) MAE5 MILLER (WILLIAM ANDERSON4, JOHN3, JAMES2, JOHN1) was born April 8, 1877 in Dallas, Polk Co, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.), and died June 1985 in Tulsa, Tulsa Co, Oklahoma (Source: Cynthia Forde.). She married OSCAR JEPTHA RINGGOLD November 28, 1897 in Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.). He was born June 22, 1875 in Scranton, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.), and died December 27, 1923 in Hominy, Osage Co, Oklahoma (Source: Cynthia Forde.).

Census Info:

1880 Arkansas, Polk Co. Fulton Twp, page 552D

 

24. FANNIE LOU RETHA5 MILLER (WILLIAM ANDERSON4, JOHN3, JAMES2, JOHN1) was born March 31, 1888 in Greenwood, Sebastian Co, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.), and died 1980 in Tucson, Arizona (Source: Cynthia Forde.). She married (1) ALBERT HARRISS Bef. 1906 (Source: Cynthia Forde.). She married (2) JAMES MARION LOONEY 1914 in Mena, Polk Co, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.). He was born June 10, 1880 in Cherokee Nation, Indian Territory, Oklahoma (Source: Cynthia Forde.), and died September 15, 1935 in Fort Smith, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.).

  • More About JAMES MARION LOONEY:  Burial: Board Camp, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.)

 

25. COY CLIFTON5 MILLER (WILLIAM ANDERSON4, JOHN3, JAMES2, JOHN1) was born June 3, 1892 in Greenwood, Sebastian Co, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.), and died May 12, 1962 in Mena, Polk Co, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.). He married RUBY ANNA KING September 25, 1916 in Albert Lea, Minnesota (Source: Cynthia Forde.), daughter of HARRY KING and ANNA SCHULTZ. She was born June 16, 1898 in Orchid, Iowa (Source: Cynthia Forde.), and died February 9, 1932 in Ennis, Texas (Source: Cynthia Forde.).

  • More About COY CLIFTON MILLER:  Burial: Cherry Hill, Mena, Arkansas (Source: Cynthia Forde.)
  • More About RUBY ANNA KING:  Burial: February 11, 1932, Myrtle Cemetery, Ennis, Texas (Source: Cynthia Forde.)

Notes for COY CLIFTON MILLER:

Information from Cynthia Forde:

Coy Clifton Miller was the second child born to a somewhat middle-aged couple in their second marriages. He was born on June 3, 1892 in Greenwood, AR. Coy's father, William Anderson Miller, was a farmer by occupation; Wm. A. was also a widower and father of twelve children from his first marriage. Coy's mother, Rebecca Jane McDonald Johnston, was the widow of William T. Johnston and mother of four very small children.

The Millers lived on a farm in Sebastian Co, AR. Coy C. Miller was baptized in the Methodist Episcopal Church in Greenwood, AR as an infant. They attended country school in the elementary years and high school in Greenwood, AR. C. C. Miller was athletic and participated in football and rowing competition. C.C. Miller was very handsome; he wore dapper white suits, high starched white collars and ties and white spats on his shoes. "He charmed the ladies," according to his daughters, Betty and JoAnn.

In his occupation as a train dispatcher for the railroad, C.C. was transferred to Albert Lea, Minnesota. Here, he met a young high school student from Northwood, IA who was learning to become a telegraph operator. Evidently, he charmed the very beautiful Ruby Anna King as well. A Northwood, IA newspaper, The Anchor, March of 1987, writes about the four King sisters, 'heads would turn, for each King sister was more beautiful than the next.' In the fall, after her graduation from Northwood High School, they were married on September 25, 1916 at First Methodist Church in Albert Lea, Minnesota.

Two years later, their first child, a boy, was stillborn. On C.C. Miller's birthday, June 3, 1920, the Millers welcomed a healthy daughter, Rose Arlene. Her birth was a source of much joy according to her sisters, Betty Jean, and JoAnn who were born in Ennis, Texas.

C. C. Miller lost the love of his life on Feb. 8, 1933 when Ruby King Miller, died of pneumonia complicated by an allergic reaction to the vaccine used to treat illnesses at that time. She had been suffering for three days with pneumonia. Coy never remarried. His daughters tell of a couple of serious relationships. He did not find the right person to share his life. He continued working with the RR until his retirement when he moved back to Mena, AR, bought a farm, settled down and raised peanuts.

The three daughters of CC and Ruby lost the sense of family they had enjoyed. When Ruby Anna died, her mother and stepfather came to Texas to live with them for a few months. In the fall, Coy was transferred to El Paso, TX and the Painters went home to Northwood. The three little girls then moved to Arkansas to live with Coy's sister, Fannie Retha Looney.

Life was hard in Arkansas in the 1930's. Depression was extremely challenging for an area of the country that had never done well. Finally, after a year, Ruby's sisters came to Arkansas and brought the three girls back to IA to live in Northwood. Rose and Betty Miller graduated from Northwood High School; Jo lived in Northwood as well but wanted to live with her father, Coy Miller, when he was finally able to stay in one location long enough to have her complete the school year. She moved to Fresno, CA where she finished high school and continued on to college.

JoAnn shares a poignant memory of her father. "Once, I was rubbing his back when tears came to his eyes as he told her that it reminded him of her mother so much." Both daughters remember that their father was an outstanding cook.

Betty Francis remembered stories Coy told her about his father, William A. Miller: "He was very hard working with great integrity, but he always had a drink of whiskey every morning upon arising. Never any more in the day, just that first swig." Ole Vold told Cynthia that Coy Miller did the very same thing.

CERTIFICATE OF MARRIAGE - STATE OF MINNESOTA, FREEBORN Co - CERTIFICATE # G-377

I hereby certify, that on the 25th day of September, 1916 at Church in Albert Lea, Freeborn Co, Minnesota, I, the undersigned, a Minister of the Gospel did join in Marriage:

Coy C. Miller, a resident of the Co of Freeborn, State of Minnesota and Ruby A. King a resident of the Co of Worth, state of Iowa.

The names of the parties after marriage shall be Coy C. Miller and Ruby A. Miller

Witnesses: William Lyle

Viola Merritt Lyle

Name of person performing ceremony, James B. Lyle, Credentials recorded, Freeborn Co, MN

 

Newspaper Data:

The first child born to Coy Miller and Ruby Anna King Miller was a stillborn baby boy. A newspaper note dated April of 1917, states,

"Mrs. J.L. Painter went to Minnesota to spend a few days to assist her daughter, Mrs. C.C. Miller, at the birth of a child." Two years later, anticipating the arrival of Rose Arlene, the Millers moved to Northwood, IA where the second child was delivered with success. The young family was transferred to Ennis, Texas sometime between 1921 and 1922. Two more daughters were born to the couple while living in Ennis, Betty Jean and JoAnn.

Rose and Betty spoke fondly of their mother's memory. They had memories of a smiling, laughing, and fun-filled mother. JoAnn does not remember her mother because she was so very young when Ruby died at the age 33 years, 8 months, and 25 days. Ruby was suffering from pneumonia and given an injection of horse serum. She was allergic to the horse serum. A funeral was held at a Methodist Church in Ennis, Texas and burial was at the Myrtle Cemetery... the cost of the service was $458.43.

Her life was not long; perhaps it is as people say, it is not the beginning and ending dates, but what happens between the dashes... the quality of life in the dash. She had a happy life; my understanding is that she was jolly, happy, and a contented woman.

In 1994, Betty and George Francis met Cynthia Vold Forde in Ennis, TX to see the grave site of Ruby Anna King Miller. Betty, Jo and Cynthia purchased a headstone for the grave. " Her grave had no marker apart from a number of the lot. At the time of her death, there had been no money to buy even a simple piece of granite that would give her an identity amongst the countless graves.

For this author, It was an indescribable experience to stand at the site of a grandmother who died so long before she was born; even more so to feel so very close to her through the simple act of providing an identity. There was a sense of deep satisfaction feeling that those who would walk through the cemetery in the future would not see a neglected unmarked grave; instead, the rose-colored granite headstone says to passersby that someone cares, "Beloved wife and mother, Ruby King Miller - June 16, 1898- February 8, 1933."

Notes for RUBY ANNA KING:

Information from Cynthia Forde:

Ruby Anna King was born to Harry Bernard King and Anna Schulz on June 16, 1898. She followed the birth of a stillborn son a year earlier. Her parents were from different worlds; Harry B. King arrived in Iowa from 'The Old Dominion,' where he spent his childhood and young manhood, in 1894 and purchased a farm in Worth Co, IA, Kensett Township. Her mother, on the other hand, was a granddaughter of a German Prussian emigrant, born in Dane Co, Wisconsin and spoke German fluently.

Ruby is found on the 1900 Federal Census, Grove Township, Worth Co, Iowa, as 1 on the age of her last birthday. April 26, 1900. She was baptized into the Methodist-Episcopal Church in Northwood as an infant, a strong concession to her father from a Roman Catholic mother.

Ruby is found on page 4A of the 1910 Federal Census, Grove Township, Worth Co, Iowa. Family Item # 63 - Family # 67.

H. B. King lists his age as 43. Anna lists her age as 33. Ruby, 11, Rose, 9, Ruth, 7, and Rena is 1 and 11/12. All four daughters are born in Iowa, HB King is listed as born in VA. Both his parents are listed as born in VA. HB is listed as a farmer with General Farm Work. He owns his farm. They have a white male boarder/farm hand named Bert Weiss, age 39 from Kentucky that lives with them.

Ruby was the eldest of four daughters; Rose Ellen, Ruth Irene, and Rena Beatrice followed her into the King family. Initially, the girls attended country school. In 1912, the family moved into Northwood into the Slosson house on North 8th Street and they were educated in Northwood. Ruby graduated in the class of 1916. Rose graduated in the class of 1919; Ruth graduated in the class of 1921. Rena went to business school in Des Moines when she was 16 years old.

Following graduation, Ruby began working full-time as a telegraph operator in Albert Lea, Minnesota where her fiancee was employed as the train dispatcher. In September of 1916, they were married at the Methodist Episcopal Church.

 

OBITUARY OF ANNA SCHULZ KING PAINTER

Residents of Northwood and vicinity shocked and grieved last Sat. morning of death of Mrs. J. L. Painter comes from Mason City where had undergone serious operation at St. Joseph's Hospital Wednesday of last week. Complications of unexpected nature caused death at 5:l5 Sat. morning. 2 of Mrs. Painter's dau. Misses Rose and Rena King had come from Des Moines Wed. Friday developed complications. Mr. Painter and Miss Rena King at bedside. Miss Ruth King daughter of Mrs. Painter employed in Los Angeles, Ca. left that city by plane Friday for Des Moines where Miss Rena King met her to bring to Northwood. Owing to bad weather plane grounded at Omaha Sat. morning making it necessary for Miss Rena King to go from Omaha to Des Moines by train. Reached Northwood Sat. eve. Funeral Tuesday 1:30 at Sorenson Funeral Home and 2 pm at Northwood Methodist Church by Rev. R. S. Phillips. Anna Shulz daughter of Carl and Barbara Shulz born Feb. 28, l882 Waunahee, Wisconsin and died Apr. l9, l94l in hospital in Mason City age 59 years, 1 m. 22 d. Lived vicinity greater part of life. Survivors husband J. L. Painter who married l922. 3 daughters Rose and Rena King of Des Moines and Ruth King of L. A.,

California. 3 grandchildren Mrs. Irving Vold, Betty and Jean Miller all of Northwood and 1 great Cynthia Vold of Northwood. 1 daughter Ruby King Miller preceded. Her 4 dau. are children of 1st marriage to Harry B. King who died l9l9. Has 4 sisters and 1 brother living. (Northwood Anchor, Northwood, Iowa, Apr. 24, l94l)

 

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